Cyberspace and Geopolitics: Assessing Global Cybersecurity Norm Processes at a Crossroads

Author
Christian Ruhl, Duncan Hollis, Wyatt Hoffman, Tim Maurer
Content Type
Working Paper
Institution
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Abstract
As cyber insecurity has become a growing problem worldwide, states and other stakeholders have sought to increase stability for cyberspace. As a result, a new ecosystem of “cyber norm” processes has emerged in diverse fora and formats. Today, United Nations (UN) groups (for example, the Group of Governmental Experts [GGE] and the Open-Ended Working Group [OEWG]), expert commissions (for example, the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace), industry coalitions (for example, the Tech Accord, the Charter of Trust), and multistakeholder collectives (for example, the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace) all purport to identify or operationalize various normative standards of behavior for states and/or other stakeholders in cyberspace. As some of these processes wind down (for example, the Global Commission) and others wind up (for example, the OEWG), cyber norms are at a crossroads where each process’s potential (and problems) looms large.
Topic
Security, Science and Technology, Cybersecurity, Geopolitics, Norms
Political Geography
Global Focus