Partisan Gerrymandering and the Construction of American Democracy, Erik J. Engstrom

Author
Seth C. McKee
Content Type
Journal Article
Journal
Political Science Quarterly
Volume
129
Issue Number
4
Publication Date
Winter 2014-15
Institution
Academy of Political Science
Abstract
Three quarters of American political history transpired before the 1960s, and yet virtually all of the research on congressional redistricting examines its effects after the 1962 one-person, one-vote ruling. The commonly held academic opinion that redistricting registers limited effects ignores the very different political setting of the late eighteenth and entire nineteenth centuries, when the absence of judicial oversight and congressional intervention produced an electoral milieu whose signature feature was noholds-barred partisan gerrymandering. The lack of attention to the role of redistricting, as it was practiced throughout most of American history, not only has created scholarly blind spots, but these gaps in knowledge have led political scientists to overemphasize the critical-election narrative of party system change and its attendant effects on congressional policymaking. - See more at: http://www.psqonline.org/article.cfm?IDArticle=19329#sthash.DVpyXMMw.dpuf
Topic
Political Economy
Political Geography
America