SIFTING THROUGH INTERDEPENDENCE

Author
Thomas Wright
Content Type
Journal Article
Journal
The Washington Quarterly
Volume
36
Issue Number
4
Publication Date
Fall 2013
Institution
Center for Strategic and International Studies
Abstract
If there is one idea that has consistently influenced western foreign policy since the Cold War, it is the notion that extending interdependence and tightening economic integration among nations is a positive development that advances peace, stability, and prosperity. As a post-Cold War idea guiding U.S. and European foreign policy, there is much to be said for it. The absorption of Eastern Europe in both the European Union and NATO helped consolidate market democracy. Globalization led to unprecedented growth in western economies, and facilitated the ascent of China and India, among others, taking billions of people out of poverty. Access to the international financial institutions also offered emerging powers the strategic option of exerting influence through existing institutions rather than trying to overturn them. Some policymakers and experts believe that this process holds the key to continuing great power peace and stability.
Topic
Foreign Policy, Cold War
Political Geography
United States, China, Europe, India