CHINA'S UNRAVELING ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY

Author
Jeffrey Reeves
Content Type
Journal Article
Journal
The Washington Quarterly
Volume
36
Issue Number
4
Publication Date
Fall 2013
Institution
Center for Strategic and International Studies
Abstract
The growing consensus among Chinese analysts, both in China and the West, that elements of China's contemporary foreign policy have been self - defeating is important but limited in two significant ways. First, it focuses on China's most divisive policy stances—such as its expansive territorial claims, disruptive diplomacy in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), or growing use of unilateral economic sanctions. This focus on controversial policies, while important, ignores less litigious policies which are also now contributing to regional instability. Second, analysts who look at China's foreign policy largely confine their work to China's relations with large or medium powers—such as Japan, India, Vietnam, or the Philippines—or with regional organizations such as ASEAN. This focus ignores China's relations with smaller, developing states—such as Cambodia, Laos, Mongolia, or Myanmar—which are, in many ways, the building blocks of China's periphery security.
Topic
Foreign Policy
Political Geography
Japan, China, India, Mongolia, Vietnam, Philippines, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar