US-China Relations: US Pivot to Asia Leaves China off Balance

Author
Bonnie Glaser, Brittany Billingsley
Content Type
Journal Article
Journal
Comparative Connections
Volume
13
Issue Number
3
Publication Date
September 2011
Institution
Center for Strategic and International Studies
Abstract
A spate of measures taken by the Obama administration to bolster US presence and influence in the Asia-Pacific was met with a variety of responses from China. Official reaction was largely muted and restrained; media responses were often strident and accused the US of seeking to contain and encircle China. President Obama met President Hu Jintao on the margins of the APEC meeting in Honolulu and Premier Wen Jiabao on the sidelines of the East Asia Summit. Tension in bilateral economic relations increased as the US stepped up criticism of China's currency and trade practices, and tit-for-tat trade measures took place with greater frequency. Amid growing bilateral friction and discontent, the 22nd Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade (JCCT) convened in Chengdu, China. An announcement by the US of a major arms sale to Taiwan in September prompted China to postpone a series of planned exchanges, but the Defense Consultative Talks nevertheless proceeded as planned in December.
Topic
Bilateral Relations
Political Geography
United States, China, East Asia, Asia