The Political and Economic Forces Shaping Concentrated Poverty

Author
William J. Wilson
Content Type
Journal Article
Journal
Political Science Quarterly
Volume
123
Issue Number
4
Publication Date
Winter 2008 - 09
Institution
Academy of Political Science
Abstract
Through the second half of the 1990s and into the early years of the twenty-first century, public attention to the plight of poor black Americans seemed to wane. There was scant media attention to the problem of concentrated urban poverty (neighborhoods in which a high percentage of the residents fall beneath the federally designated poverty line), little or no discussion of inner-city challenges by mainstream political leaders, and even an apparent quiescence on the part of ghetto residents themselves. This was dramatically different from the 1960s, when the transition from legal segregation to a more racially open society was punctuated by social unrest that sometimes expressed itself in violent terms, as seen in the riots that followed the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Topic
Economics
Political Geography
America