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  • Publication Date: 04-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Africa Policy Information Center
  • Abstract: This week when the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) hold their annual spring meetings in Washington, DC, Africa's debt crisis will hardly appear on their agenda.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, Economics, Human Rights, Human Welfare, Poverty
  • Political Geography: Africa, United States, Iraq, Washington, Middle East, Arabia
  • Author: Salih Booker, Ann-Louise Colgan
  • Publication Date: 01-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Africa Policy Information Center
  • Abstract: The U.S.' Africa policy will continue to be characterized by a duplicity that has emerged as the principal hallmark of the Bush Administration approach to the continent. On the one hand, Africa's priorities are being marginalized and undermined by a U.S. foreign policy preoccupied with other parts of the world. On the other hand, the Bush White House is callously manipulating Africa, claiming to champion the continent's needs with its compassionate conservative agenda.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, Economics, Human Rights, Human Welfare, Poverty, War
  • Political Geography: Africa, United States
  • Author: Ayesha Imam
  • Publication Date: 02-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The Wilson Center
  • Abstract: An Introduction from Directors Howard Wolpe and Haleh Esfandiari: This past September, the Woodrow Wilson International Center's Africa and Middle East Programs co-sponsored a forum on Women, Islam and Human Rights in Africa.At the forum, a notable keynote address was presented by the distinguished feminist scholar, Ayesha Imam, coordinator of the Nigerian women's rights organization, BAOBOB.We believe that Dr. Imam's remarks, presented in the form of responses to queries posed by Woodrow Wilson Fellow and forum organizer, Mary Osirim, deserve a wider audience. Dr. Imam's address becomes the second in a series of WWICS Africa Program Occasional Papers. A report on the September 17, 2003 forum can be found on the WWICS website, www.wilsoncenter.org.
  • Topic: Civil Society, Human Rights, Religion
  • Political Geography: Africa
  • Author: Michael Rubin
  • Publication Date: 06-2004
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: The Washington Institute for Near East Policy
  • Abstract: Secretary of State Colin Powell will visit Sudan on Tuesday, June 29, stopping first in Khartoum before visiting the war-torn western province of Darfur. Powell will be the first U.S. secretary of state to visit Sudan since Cyrus Vance in 1978. In addition to meetings with Sudanese officials, Powell will confer with UN secretary-general Kofi Annan, who will be in Sudan as part of a three-week tour of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe.
  • Topic: Security, Religion
  • Political Geography: Africa, Europe, Sudan, Middle East, Asia, Arab Countries
  • Author: Matthew Levitt
  • Publication Date: 01-2004
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: The Washington Institute for Near East Policy
  • Abstract: On December 25, 2003, Union Transport Africaines (UTA) Flight 141 bound for Beirut crashed on take-off from Cotonou, Benin, in West Africa. According to accounts in the Arab press, a "foreign relations official of the African branch of the Lebanese Hizballah party and two of his aides" were among those killed. The Hizballah officials were reportedly carrying $2 million in contributions, raised from wealthy Lebanese nationals living in Africa, to the organization's headquarters in Beirut. In fact, Hizballah maintains a worldwide network engaged in financial, logistical, and operational terrorist activities, often in close cooperation with Iranian intelligence services. Hizballah operatives in Africa raise and launder significant sums of money, recruit local operatives, collect preoperational intelligence, and support the organization's terrorist activities against Israeli, U.S., and other Western interests.
  • Topic: Conflict Resolution
  • Political Geography: Africa, United States, Iran, Middle East, Arab Countries
  • Publication Date: 03-2004
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: The Carter Center
  • Abstract: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Mrs. Carter, and Executive Director John Hardman traveled to West Africa Feb. 2-6 to focus international attention on the need to eliminate the last 1 percent of Guinea worm disease remaining in the world and launch a development initiative in Mali.
  • Topic: Human Welfare
  • Political Geography: Africa, South America, Caribbean, Mali
  • Author: Lyn Boyd Judson
  • Publication Date: 03-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for International Studies, University of Southern California
  • Abstract: On October 29, 1997, South African President Nelson Mandela arrived in Libya to award Colonel Muammar Qaddafi the Good Hope Medal. The Medal, also referred to as the Order of Good Hope, is the highest honor that South Africa can bestow upon a citizen of another country--it would be given a year later to US President Bill Clinton. At the time, Colonel Qaddafi was a pariah in the international community. Libya had been under United Nations sanctions since 1992 for its refusal to hand over the two indicted suspects in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, that killed 270 people.
  • Topic: International Relations, Globalization, Government, United Nations
  • Political Geography: Africa, United States, Libya, United Nations, Scotland
  • Author: Roland Marchal
  • Publication Date: 09-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Internationales
  • Abstract: The peace agreements that were signed in May 2004 may imply the end of the war in South Sudan. In order to assess the likelihood of success, one has to discuss the changes after the Islamists were brought to power in 1989 by a military coup. Of special interest are the impacts of their internal divisions, the emergence of oil money as significant revenues for the State and the consequences of 9/11 in the Middle East. Moreover, difficulties to implement the agreements in South Sudan should not be underplayed. The underdevelopment of this region, the existence of militias still supported by Khartoum and the history of the civil war among Southern Sudanese could give room to bitter divisions and proxy wars involving Khartoum's government. The current crisis in Darfur reflects the weaknesses of the peace process despite a strong international involvement. Structural issues such as citizenship have not been addressed and this very crisis shows how little the regime intends to reform itself.
  • Topic: Conflict Resolution, Peace Studies
  • Political Geography: Africa, Middle East, South Sudan
  • Author: Jeffrey O. Isima, Chris Ferguson
  • Publication Date: 01-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Global Facilitation Network for Security Sector Reform
  • Abstract: Security Sector Reform has continued to emerge as a powerful organising force among international actors dedicated to conflict prevention and poverty reduction. As the broader strands of the SSR concept are becoming increasingly recognisable and understood it will be important to emphasise that effective SSR implementation requires a balanced approach across the whole security sector.
  • Topic: Security, Development, Human Rights
  • Political Geography: Africa
  • Author: Ann Fitz-Gerald
  • Publication Date: 09-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Global Facilitation Network for Security Sector Reform
  • Abstract: This document looks at some of the important key processes that supported conflict resolution activities in Sierra Leone. It by no means provides a comprehensive analysis - rather it is designed to draw attention to some of the processes that were used to inform conflict resolution activities that might be being considered elsewhere. While many of these initiatives proved successful, mistakes were made thus the document is not meant to serve as an illustration of 'best practice' but more as a repository of ideas. Despite the 'health warnings' that should come with any documents that review the activity in Sierra Leone, important steps were taken towards developing more innovative practice and approaches within more holistic Security Sector Reform programmes. Moreover, Sierra Leone serves as a fairly unique example of a country requiring numerous reforms across the security sector, thus, much can be drawn from this single case study in terms of 'multiple entry points' and 'sequencing strategies'. This contrasts with many other country or regional case studies that may focus on a smaller number of reform imperatives.
  • Topic: Conflict Resolution, Security, Civil War
  • Political Geography: Africa, Sierra Leone