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You searched for: Publishing Institution Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center Political Geography Philippines Remove constraint Political Geography: Philippines Publication Year within 10 Years Remove constraint Publication Year: within 10 Years Topic Health Remove constraint Topic: Health
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  • Author: Marjorie Pajaron
  • Publication Date: 12-2018
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center
  • Abstract: This paper shows that, for mothers in Cebu, Philippines, access to electricity and the type of cooking fuel used at home affect both health outcomes and also how time is allocated, including for paid work. First, the use of fuelwood for cooking adversely affects the health of mothers, who are traditionally responsible for cooking and are often at home, taking care of their families. This result is consistent across different econometric specifications. Second, shifting to a more efficient source of energy allows women more time to be engaged in the labor force, including in micro enterprises. It also enables them to reallocate their time and efforts away from household chores (cooking, tending animals, and childcare) toward caring for themselves (improved personal hygiene and rest). Drafting and strengthening existing gender-sensitive energy policies and programs can, therefore, help the welfare of mothers in the Philippines, where 54% of households rely on fuelwood, and where the resulting indoor air pollution has a particularly adverse impact on women.
  • Topic: Gender Issues, Health, Birthing
  • Political Geography: Philippines, Asia-Pacific
  • Author: Marjorie Pajaron
  • Publication Date: 11-2018
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center
  • Abstract: Risky health behaviors such as illicit drug use, smoking, overconsumption of alcohol, violence, and early sexual activity have contemporaneous and intertemporal adverse health and economic outcomes. The health-related and economic costs to individuals and to society overall are particularly pronounced when adolescents are the ones engaging in one or more of such behaviors. This paper uses longitudinal data from the Philippines (from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey) to examine the long-term impact of adolescents’ risky behaviors in 2002 (related to sex, tobacco, alcohol, and violence, but not drugs) on their economic outcomes in 2009 (related to participation in the labor force, educational attainment, and family formation). The results reveal that risky behaviors are most likely to affect educational outcomes. Teenagers who smoked at least one cigarette a day were 21% less likely to be in college several years later, and this difference was 17% for those who had an early sexual initiation, and 7% for those who consumed alcohol at least once a week. Labor outcomes were also adversely affected.
  • Topic: Health, Labor Issues, Behavior, Socioeconomics , Risk Factors
  • Political Geography: Philippines, Asia-Pacific