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You searched for: Publishing Institution Columbia International Affairs Online Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Columbia International Affairs Online Topic Development Remove constraint Topic: Development
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  • Author: Michael Bhatia, Kevin Lanigan, Philip Wilkinson
  • Publication Date: 06-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Columbia International Affairs Online
  • Abstract: Prime Minister Tony Blair's 2003 declaration that the international community “will not walk away from” Afghanistan missed the real question: When will the international community really walk into Afghanistan, and make the necessary commitments and investments that will give the Afghan people a reasonable chance at building a peaceful and stable country?
  • Topic: Conflict Resolution, Security, Development, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, Central Asia, Asia
  • Author: Emmanuel K. Ngwainmbi
  • Publication Date: 03-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Columbia International Affairs Online
  • Abstract: This paper appraises communications as business and examines the impact of new information technology on the productivity of the black entrepreneur (African American (AAs) and African (ABs) mid-scale businesspersons) and provides insights into market conditions in both communities to the mindset of the African entrepreneur and implications for partnership management. Further, it describes the black entrepreneur's access to business information, implications for partnership and a background for strategic planning. Research shows there are potential mutual benefits for African and African American media entrepreneurs, with proper strategic planning and information sharing.
  • Topic: Development, Emerging Markets, Industrial Policy
  • Political Geography: Africa
  • Author: Emmanuel K. Ngwainmbi
  • Publication Date: 03-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Columbia International Affairs Online
  • Abstract: The paper revisits the key problematics of conceptualizing culture, the ethnographic relevance of cross cultural communication in business management, and the theoretical and pragmatic differences between glocalization, Euro-American and West African business management ethics and socioeconomic change in NEPAD (The New Partnership for African Development) countries. Further, it examines the power dynamics of the local sub-cultures (manager, employee and local consumer) and the fundamental cultural differences between local and foreign managers and provides the contexts within which such core differences cultivate a hybrid business environment and enhance translocal negotiations. Finally, it discusses the triangular connection between hegemony, ICT and social change and identifies situations in urban W. African communities where local-foreign knowledge and technical resources promote globalization in the region.
  • Topic: Development, Globalization, Government
  • Political Geography: Africa, America
  • Author: Robert B. Smith
  • Publication Date: 11-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Columbia International Affairs Online
  • Abstract: The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) ranks countries annually on its human development index (HDI), which combines a country's measures of longevity, literacy, and per capita income. This paper applies hierarchical modeling to quantify the factors that predict a country's HDI rank, explain the variability between regions, 2 R , and explain the variability between countries within a region, 2 c . It assesses the effects of nine civilizations: African, Buddhist, Hindu, Japanese, Latin, Moslem, Orthodox, Sinic, and Western. Civilization strongly predicts a country's rank on the HDI, but it does not provide the strongest causal explanation of the variability in the HDI quantified by 2 R and 2 c . Among the covariates studied here, present-day slavery (debt bondage, forced labor, chattel slavery, and prostitution) and the lack of political freedom explain much of the variability that is between regions, and corruption explains much of the variability among countries within a region. Additionally, countries with high rates of conflict and social unrest and debt have significantly worse positions on the HDI. Civilizations are best viewed as pointers to underlying social mechanisms like women's education that more directly determine development; its advance may enhance development
  • Topic: Demographics, Development, Economics, Human Welfare
  • Political Geography: United Nations