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  • Publication Date: 01-2019
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Centre for Policy Research, India
  • Abstract: Keeping alive CPR’s long tradition of publishing important scholarly, field-defining books, this year too, CPR faculty published books in fields as diverse as international relations, environmental law, electricity regulation, socioeconomic rights and politics. I particularly want to mention two CPR faculty who published their first books to wide acclaim. Zorawar Daulet Singh, a scholar in international relations, made an important contribution through original archival work to understand India’s foreign policy in the Nehru and Indira Gandhi years and through this prism understand contemporary foreign policy challenges. Another important publication was Shibani Ghosh’s edited volume on Indian environmental law. Drawing on contributions from several leading thinkers and lawyers in the field, this book is the first serious, scholarly engagement with the emerging environmental legal framework in India. CPR faculty also made regular contributions in non-academic journals, newspapers and seminars and in the process, enriched the public discourse, infusing much needed evidence and sobriety. This year, CPR faculty published 452 articles in major national and international dailies and popular journals
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Maanav Kumar, Parag Mohanty
  • Publication Date: 03-2019
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Centre for Policy Research, India
  • Abstract: This study looks at the development of legal and regulatory framework governing drinking water and sanitation services in South Africa, England and United States. Around 780 million worldwide do not have access to clean drinking water and almost 2.5 billion people lack access to improved sanitation according to data published by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In such a situation, it becomes extremely important to study the legal and regulatory measures used internationally to control, manage and improve these resources. This study, covering South Africa, England and USA, sets out to identify, comprehend and analyze these legal frameworks and structures; examine the control exercised by national, state/provincial as well as municipal governments over water and sanitation-related questions; and the responsive measures being taken by them to preserve the water resources and their quality for future generations. The authors have observed that in presence of varying geographical, historical and social factors, while it would be impossible to compare each model against the other on the basis of merit, it becomes increasingly important for governments to balance the individual’s right to water with the planet’s ecological balance.
  • Topic: Environment, Government, Natural Resources, Water, Law, Regulation, Legislation, Sanitation
  • Political Geography: South Asia, India, Asia, Global Focus
  • Author: Aparna Sharma
  • Publication Date: 01-2016
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Centre for Policy Research, India
  • Abstract: Speaking at a recent summit, the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi referred to India as a bright spot in the global economy. India’s rapid domestic growth and growing integration with global trade, technology and financial flows support his assertion; yet, all this is not translating into peak progress in South Asia, to which New Delhi avowedly assigns high priority. Despite India climbing nine positions in the Ease of Doing Business index (164 to 155 - out of 180 countries), its ranking vis-a-vis facilitating border trade (133) remains unchanged since the last five years. In the absence of timely reforms to bolster food security in South Asia, Sanitary and Phyto-Sanitary (SPS) measures, Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) and administrative measures for trade facilitation have emerged as the biggest concern to South Asia’s food trade. 86 percent of South Asia’s food trade remains crippled with non-standard implementation of SPS and TBT measures.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus