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You searched for: Content Type Working Paper Remove constraint Content Type: Working Paper Publishing Institution Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA) Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA) Publication Year within 5 Years Remove constraint Publication Year: within 5 Years Publication Year within 10 Years Remove constraint Publication Year: within 10 Years Topic Education Remove constraint Topic: Education
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  • Author: Tony Cavoli, Ilke Onur, Patricia Sourdin
  • Publication Date: 09-2020
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA)
  • Abstract: Using the World Bank’s Global Findex data, this research first shows that the efforts by the Indian Government and the Reserve Bank have been successful in providing access to formal banking services, especially in the rural areas of the country. Similarly, financial account ownership gap has been eliminated in terms of gender and income. Further analysis, using the Financial Inclusion Insights dataset, shows that financial inclusion has a positive and significant effect on reducing poverty in India. A closer look at the utilisation of the financial accounts shows that active usage of these accounts would lead to further reductions in poverty levels in India. Therefore, targeted programmes, such as offering financial education both in and outside schools, with the aim of improving financial literacy, could lead to further poverty reduction in India.
  • Topic: Education, Poverty, Finance, Banks
  • Political Geography: India, Asia
  • Author: Sasiwimon W. Paweenawat
  • Publication Date: 12-2020
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA)
  • Abstract: This study provides evidence of intergenerational transmission of human capital in Thailand, using data from the Thailand Labor Force Survey of 1985–2017. Employing the instrumental variable approach using Thailand’s compulsory educational reform of 1978 as the instrumental variable to minimise bias caused by the endogeneity of parental education, this study estimates the effect of parental education on children’s education and their labour market outcomes. Besides reaffirming the conventional positive link between parental and children’s years of education, new and intriguing evidence is put forth on the negative link between parental education and the child’s brawn skill, based on the industry and occupation adopted by the child in the labour market. The influence of paternal education is found to outweigh that of maternal education, in contrast to the evidence from developed countries. High intergenerational educational persistence and low intergenerational mobility indicate unequal opportunities in the country, as individual welfare is largely tied to parental background. Therefore, it is recommended that the Government of Thailand weaken this linkage to improve equality in the country.
  • Topic: Education, Reform, Children, Parenting
  • Political Geography: Asia, Thailand
  • Author: Dyah Pritadrajati
  • Publication Date: 12-2020
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA)
  • Abstract: Most economic research on minimum wage has focused on employment effects. Research analysing the effects of minimum wage on skill acquisition and educational investment is limited, especially in developing countries. To fill the gap in the literature, this paper investigates the relationship of minimum wage and human capital investment using the National Socioeconomic Survey (Susenas). This study is an effort to further analyse whether the minimum wage policy supports or even hinders recent government efforts to keep students in school. The government may be unaware of the possible interaction of different policies, especially in a developing country where inter-sectoral policy coordination is limited. This paper finds that minimum wage legislation has significant negative substitution effect on educational investment, i.e. individuals are more likely to drop out of senior secondary school due to an increase in minimum wage. There is no evidence of gender bias in human capital investment, at least as a response to increasing minimum wage. Even though the response to an increase in minimum wage amongst low-income households is positive, the results of a regression incorporating an interaction term suggest that the substitution effect is the dominant factor. Therefore, the positive result amongst low-income households might be generated by a fall in the probability of obtaining low-skilled employment that offsets the substitution effect.
  • Topic: Education, Children, Human Capital, Minimum Wage
  • Political Geography: ASEAN