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You searched for: Publishing Institution Hudson Institute Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Hudson Institute Publication Year within 25 Years Remove constraint Publication Year: within 25 Years Topic Science and Technology Remove constraint Topic: Science and Technology
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  • Author: Lee Lane
  • Publication Date: 01-2014
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Hudson Institute
  • Abstract: The U.S. intelligence community and other federal agencies have commissioned the National Academies of Science (NAS) to study climate engineering. The term 'climate engineering' (CE) refers to a family of concepts that might be used to curtail global warming. In 2013, the NAS assembled an expert panel to study the subject. The panel plans to issue a report in the fall of 2014.
  • Topic: Security, Climate Change, Intelligence, Science and Technology
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Harold Furchtgott-Roth, Jeffrey Li
  • Publication Date: 11-2013
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Hudson Institute
  • Abstract: Over the past 20 years, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC” or “Commission”), often in coordination with the Department of Justice (“DoJ”), has reviewed dozens of mergers and acquisitions involving companies offering various forms of communications services, and many offering various forms of wireless services. To approve license transfers and other regulatory authorizations associated with each of these mergers and acquisitions, the FCC issues an order in which it often discusses antitrust issues including a definition of a “relevant product market” to assess the likely competitive effect of the merger.
  • Topic: Economics, Markets, Science and Technology, Communications
  • Author: Robert W. Poole, Jr.
  • Publication Date: 11-2013
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Hudson Institute
  • Abstract: Air travel requires communication between aircraft and ground facilities—to maintain safe distances between aircraft and accurate flight paths from origin to destination, and to provide pilots with current information on weather and other critical variables. In the earliest days of aviation, flight communication consisted of little more than visual cues from the ground from directional pointers, hilltop bonfires, and airport beacons. The advent of radio in the 1920s brought voice communications between pilots and ground controllers. That was the beginning of active "air traffic control" (or ATC, an acronym used throughout this report).
  • Topic: International Cooperation, International Law, Science and Technology, Governance, Reform
  • Author: Harold Furchtgott-Roth
  • Publication Date: 06-2013
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Hudson Institute
  • Abstract: This paper proposes that the Federal Communications Commission adopt rules to allow practically all of the electromagnetic spectrum to be allocated flexibly in response to market conditions and to allow licensees to use their spectrum flexibly. This approach is consistent with the direction of FCC decisions to allow greater spectrum flexibility and would be economically far superior to recent FCC proposals for broadcast spectrum auctions. Spectrum flexibility—or “Open Spectrum”—would eliminate the much-lamented wireless broadband “shortage” without delay and would foster greater innovation in American spectrum markets and transactions and in wireless services and products. The econo mic value of Open Spectrum is probably orders of magnitude greater than the projected $15 billion in receipts from the FCC's broadcast spectrum auctions.
  • Topic: Economics, Science and Technology, Communications
  • Political Geography: United States, Japan, America
  • Author: Hanns Kuttner
  • Publication Date: 06-2012
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Hudson Institute
  • Abstract: In any market, buyers seek out the seller who offers the lowest prices and best terms. Government can distort markets by decreasing or increasing prices through subsidies, taxes or regulation. Compared to a free market, distortion means different sellers get the sale and at different prices.
  • Topic: Economics, International Trade and Finance, Markets, Science and Technology
  • Author: Lee Lane
  • Publication Date: 09-2012
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Hudson Institute
  • Abstract: Americans are right to be dismayed with U.S. energy policy. For forty years, presidents of both parties have backed a series of fanciful "breakthrough technologies." From synfuels to Solyndra, these schemes have turned out to be costly disappointments and the source of a recurring political drama. After failures become clear, Congress sometimes conducts oversight hearings. But it welcomes each new scheme as a pretext for pork barrel politics. Neither the executive nor the legislature ever learns from past failures.
  • Topic: Energy Policy, Science and Technology
  • Political Geography: United States, China, Germany