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You searched for: Content Type Working Paper Remove constraint Content Type: Working Paper Publishing Institution Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies (NTS) Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies (NTS) Political Geography Southeast Asia Remove constraint Political Geography: Southeast Asia Topic Security Remove constraint Topic: Security
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  • Author: Tang Siew Mun
  • Publication Date: 09-2013
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies (NTS)
  • Abstract: The Malaysian security sector is undergoing a major transformation. The Najib administration has broken the mould, implementing a series of reforms that have resulted in the expansion of political space and discourse. Consequently, the polity may become increasingly unstable, unless these reforms are accompanied by the deepening and institutionalisation of the rule of law and the development of a mature political culture. This paper identifies five priority areas for security sector governance (SSG) in Malaysia, namely, independence of the judiciary, advancement of human rights, broadening of political space, rule of law and enforcement, and institutional oversight capacity. The net effect of the security sector reforms (SSRs) is the levelling of the political playing field, which effectively weakens the hands of the incumbents. Herein lies the paradox. The fate and progress of SSR is contingent on a strong government to stay the course of reforms and to prevent a relapse. At the same time, these reforms have the unintended effect of chipping away the Najib administration's political power.
  • Topic: Security, Arms Control and Proliferation, Governance
  • Political Geography: Malaysia, Southeast Asia
  • Author: Lorraine Elliott
  • Publication Date: 02-2012
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies (NTS)
  • Abstract: Migration and displacement are among the range of pressures on people and their communities likely to arise from the economic, social and environmental consequences of climate change. Despite fragmented data, the climate security literature has focused on the potential for climate change-induced migration to trigger social tensions and conflict within states and across borders. A human security approach seeks to ensure that people are placed at the centre of concerns about mobility and migration in response to climate change. This requires more than identifying those who are vulnerable to migration pressures. It necessitates an understanding of how migration and mobility choices are made, how vulnerabilities can be managed in ways that are participatory and responsive to local needs and circumstances, and how local, national and regional policy responses can strengthen the knowledge base and improve collaborative platforms for action.
  • Topic: Security, Climate Change, Economics, Environment, Migration
  • Political Geography: Southeast Asia
  • Author: Pavin Chachavalpongpun
  • Publication Date: 06-2012
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies (NTS)
  • Abstract: The concept of Responsibility to Protect (R2P) is relatively new to many Southeast Asians, who have traditionally relied on the state for security and therefore faced a sense of hopelessness when such protection was lacking. While the state represented the only institution ensuring human security for the masses in the past, civil society organisations (CSOs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have today emerged as indispensable non-state actors campaigning for humanitarian interventions in situations where the state has failed in the provision of human security. Indeed, CSOs and NGOs are playing crucial roles in advocating and championing the cause of R2P despite encountering extensive obstacles, which range from an overwhelming sovereignty- conscious mentality, and an exploitation of cultural pretexts such as Asian values on the part of the state for a justification of its apathetic attitude toward R2P, to a lack of awareness among the people about the significance of R2P to their own security.
  • Topic: Security, Human Rights, Non-Governmental Organization, Governance
  • Political Geography: Southeast Asia
  • Author: Youngho Chang, Nur Azha Putra
  • Publication Date: 06-2010
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies (NTS)
  • Abstract: The Non-Traditional Security (NTS) Perspective on the Energy Security Policies in Singapore By Youngho Chang and Nur Azha Putra The Singapore government treats energy security as a means towards achieving sustainable economic growth. It is on that note that the Economic Strategies Committee (ESC) and National Energy Policy (NEP) reports recommended strategies which are meant to steer the nation towards economic competitiveness, energy security and environmental sustainability. To date, both reports provide the clearest indication of what the future energy security landscape will look like in Singapore. These reports also underline the belief that an efficient energy market would inevitably drive economic growth, and generate wealth and security for the nation. However, energy security should also be about human security as much as it is about economic growth, according to non-traditional security (NTS) literature. The NTS perspective argues that energy security should also account for the welfare and development of individuals, households and communities, among other things. Building upon the NTS discourse, this paper attempts to unpack Singapore's energy policies by tracing and analysing the rationale behind the role of oil in the nation's economic development, and explores its implication for human security.
  • Topic: Security, Energy Policy
  • Political Geography: Singapore, Southeast Asia
  • Author: Mely Caballero-Anthony, Paul Teng, Margarita Escaler, Pau Khan Khup Hangzo
  • Publication Date: 08-2010
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies (NTS)
  • Abstract: This synthesis provides the main findings of the Food Security Expert Group Meeting which was convened by the RSIS Centre for Non-Traditional Security (NTS) Studies in Singapore on 4–5 August 2010. The Meeting brought together experts from multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and regional organisations, universities, agribusiness firms and relevant Singapore government agencies. The Meeting aimed to examine the context of urban food security relative to global food security and rural food security; explore the development of an ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) Food Security Management Information System; assist in developing a research agenda on urban food security; and identify possible roles for Singapore in the global food system.
  • Topic: Security, Agriculture, Development, Food
  • Political Geography: Singapore, Southeast Asia