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  • Author: Hassan Abbas
  • Publication Date: 07-2012
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: This report seeks to provide a much-needed framework for police and law enforcement reform in Pakistan in the hope that the country's policy makers and political actors will incorporate police reform into the national agenda. It is encouraging to note that some political parties in Pakistan are now emphasizing the need for police reform in their political manifest.
  • Topic: Security, Crime, Development, Counterinsurgency, Law Enforcement
  • Political Geography: Pakistan, South Asia
  • Author: Hassan Abbas
  • Publication Date: 05-2011
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: In recent years, Pakistan has stumbled from one crisis to another. A number of political and socioeconomic challenges threaten to further destabilize a country that already is reeling from insurgencies along its northwestern border. Pakistan's newest democratic government is struggling to maintain control over parts of its territory where militant religious groups are intent on challenging its authority and legitimacy. The country's conflict with India over Kashmir, now in its seventh decade, appears as intractable as ever, and the war in neighboring Afghanistan has deepened instability throughout Pakistan. The transition from a near-decade-long rule under a military dictatorship is slow and complicated, as rampant corruption and politicization of the bureaucracy present huge obstacles to the state-building process.
  • Topic: Conflict Resolution, Foreign Policy, Democratization, Development, Economics, Education, Health Care Policy
  • Political Geography: Pakistan, Afghanistan, South Asia
  • Publication Date: 04-2008
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: Coming in the midst of a very heated U.S. presidential election campaign, where the U.S. is faced with numerous foreign policy challenges in the Asia-Pacific region and at a critical juncture in Islam's relationship with the rest of the world, the Asia Society convened over 50 Asian and American leaders at a very opportune time in Bali, Indonesia from April 3-6, 2008. Delegates discussed the characteristics of Islam in Asian countries with multiethnic or multireligious populations like India, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. They also suggested ways of tackling radicalism and extremism by alleviating poverty, improving education, and reforming prisons and rehabilitation Centres, to name a few. During the second half of the conference, delegates engaged in a conversation about the evolving U.S. role in Asia. Contemporary affairs like the protests in Myanmar and Tibet, engagement with North Korea, and the impact of the Iraq war on U.S. foreign policy towards Asia were analyzed in light of the coming presidential election. Asian leaders were invited to give advice to the new U.S. president. Finally, young leaders from the Asia Pacific region shared their thoughts on what kinds of leadership and values are needed in the future.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, International Trade and Finance, Islam, Post Colonialism, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: United States, South Asia, Indonesia, India, Israel, Asia, Southeast Asia
  • Author: Nermeen Shaikh
  • Publication Date: 01-2007
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: Edward Luce is the Washington bureau chief for the Financial Times. He was the paper's South Asia bureau chief, based in New Delhi, between 2001 and 2006. From 1999–2000, Luce worked in the Clinton administration as the speechwriter to Treasury Secretary Larry Summers. Educated at Oxford and married into an Indian family, Luce now lives in Washington, D.C.
  • Topic: Development, Economics, Politics
  • Political Geography: South Asia, Washington, India, Asia, New Delhi
  • Author: Nermeen Shaikh
  • Publication Date: 11-2006
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: Good evening, and thank you Dan for that nice introduction. It is a pleasure to be here at the Asia Society. Thank you, Vishakha [Desai, President] for your remarks and also for inviting me.
  • Topic: Security, Foreign Policy, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: United States, South Asia, Asia
  • Author: Nermeen Shaikh
  • Publication Date: 02-2005
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: Christopher de Bellaigue is the correspondent for the Economist in Tehran. He studied Persian and Indian Studies at Cambridge University and has spent the last decade living and working in the Middle East and South Asia. He writes for the New York Review of Books, Granta and the New Yorker.
  • Topic: International Relations, Foreign Policy
  • Political Geography: New York, Europe, South Asia, Middle East, India
  • Author: Peggy Reeves Sanday
  • Publication Date: 04-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: The distinction made in Indonesia and elsewhere between political Islam (also called Islamism) and cultural Islam puts into sharp relief the reality that in many parts of the Islamic world communities subscribing to the "five pillars" of Islamic practice also live in syncretism with traditions that can be traced to centuries-old pre-Islamic traditions. Like Christianity and many of the world's other religious traditions, the spread of Islam was due to its ability to accommodate not abolish local tradition.
  • Topic: Security, Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: South Asia, Indonesia
  • Author: Nermeen Shaikh
  • Publication Date: 12-2002
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: Talal Asad has conducted extensive research on the phenomenon of religion (and secularism), particularly the religious revival in the Middle East. Professor Asad is the author of Genealogies of Religion: Discipline and Reasons of Power in Christianity and Islam (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993). His new book, Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity will be published by Stanford University Press in February 2003. Professor Asad is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center.
  • Topic: Government, Religion
  • Political Geography: South Asia, Middle East
  • Author: Justin Sommers, Rapporteur
  • Publication Date: 11-2001
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Asia Society are pleased to present the report of our conference entitled “The India-China Relationship: What the United States Needs to Know,” which took place in Washington, D.C., on November 30, 2001. The conference, engaging experts and policymakers both in and out of government, was one phase in a larger joint project of the two organizations that will result in a scholarly volume.
  • Topic: Diplomacy, Political Economy
  • Political Geography: United States, China, South Asia, Washington, India, Asia
  • Author: Marshall Bouton
  • Publication Date: 07-1998
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: It was recognized at the outset of the workshop that India's and Pakistan's nuclear tests in May 1998 raised a number of questions, both broad and specific. Three broad, but counter-intuitive questions were identified. First, just how much have the tests really changed the international nuclear non-proliferation regime and South Asia's security situation? A case can be made that the two countries' tests do no more than make explicit their nuclear capabilities, which have been fairly confidently known for years if not decades. Second, are there enhanced opportunities for stability and security as a result of the tests? While on the one hand the tests increase risks of conflict resulting from miscalculations and accidents, it is also possible that they will focus the attention of India and Pakistan on reducing tensions between them, and on increasing the security of the region as a whole. The tests might also have the benefit of making external actors such as China more aware of South Asia's security dynamics and the implications of its own policies for the region. Third, how much influence does the international community have on India's and Pakistan's nuclear weapons programs? In the past, India and Pakistan have been strongly resistant to external efforts to influence their security policies, and it is quite likely that this will remain the case despite strong responses to the tests from countries such as the United States.
  • Topic: Nationalism, Nuclear Weapons
  • Political Geography: Pakistan, United States, China, South Asia, India