Search

You searched for: Content Type Special Report Remove constraint Content Type: Special Report
Number of results to display per page

Search Results

  • Publication Date: 02-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: The Carter Center
  • Abstract: The Carter Center’s in-depth report, “A State Affair: Privatizing Congo’s Copper Concessions,” is the culmination of the Center’s analysis of mining sector trends in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) since the end of the Zaire era 20 years ago, with a strong focus on the DRC’s key state-owned mining company, Gécamines. The report draws on the Center’s detailed analysis of the mining contract review process in the DRC following the 2006 elections and includes a broader economic and political analysis of mining privatization in the former Katanga province, a region particularly rich in copper and cobalt.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Basel Ammane
  • Publication Date: 01-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Council on International Policy (CIP)
  • Abstract: The Nile Basin is among numerous areas around the world that experience water scarcity. Many of the countries that are in it fail to meet the minimum of 2,740 litres per person per day needed to avoid being listed as a country with chronic water scarcity. 1 To make matters worse, the collective population of these countries is expected to rise to around 647 million by 2030, a 52 percent increase from what it was in 2010 according to the UN Population Division
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Marcelo Lopez de Aragon
  • Publication Date: 08-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Council on International Policy (CIP)
  • Abstract: Thanks to the ruling majority in the Brazilian Parliament, President Michel Temer, a self-styled political centrist, was barely saved on August 2, 2017, from undergoing a corruption trial that could have led to his dismissal and potential imprisonment. The Brazilian president is accused of accepting bribes in exchange for granting political favours to various Brazilian companies and politicians since 2010. According to secret telephone recordings taken of the president, these illegal practices reportedly continued after Temer took the presidential reigns. Regardless of the judicial fate of the Brazilian president, the fact that his mandate is peppered with scandals reflects how corruption has spread throughout the Brazilian political system like a cancer metastasized across the halls of power.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Marcelo Lopez de Aragon
  • Publication Date: 06-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Council on International Policy (CIP)
  • Abstract: Founded in 1948, the Organization of American States (OAS) is billed as the premier political multilateral forum of the western hemisphere with 34 member states. At its core, the raison d’être of the OAS rests on the promotion and safeguarding of four pillars: democracy, human rights, security and development.
  • Topic: International Relations, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Fuad Olajuwon
  • Publication Date: 03-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Council on International Policy (CIP)
  • Abstract: Japan is in a unique position. With the rise of Trump and the changing of the American political landscape, the world faces a new challenge. That challenge is uncertainty. If you’re from a realist background, that raises concern. The shifting of the global narrative is one to look out for, as countries across Europe and the Western world are shifting away from the “liberal world order” and more into an ideologist that puts the concerns of the host over that of the guest. With Brexit and “#AmericaFirst” rhetoric gaining momentum, what is the fate of East Asia? One thing is sure: this is a unique time as ever for Japan to stand on its own two feet.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Basel Ammane
  • Publication Date: 10-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Council on International Policy (CIP)
  • Abstract: The Nile Basin is among numerous areas around the world that experience water scarcity. Many of the countries that are in it fail to meet the minimum of 2,740 litres per person per day needed to avoid being listed as a country with chronic water scarcity. To make matters worse, the collective population of these countries is expected to rise to around 647 million by 2030, a 52 percent increase from what it was in 2010 according to the UN Population Division. Fortunately, however, there does not seem to be sufficient evidence to establish a strong relationship of one-way causality between water scarcity and conflict. In fact, a comprehensive study of the matter at Oregon State University in 2001 concluded that incidents of cooperation far outnumbered those of conflict among countries that shared a water resource and experienced water scarcity. This paints a substantially different picture from that portrayed by the dramatic rhetoric expressing quasi-certainty about the occurrence of water wars one typically encounters in sensationalistic pieces. What’s more, the record has shown that the typical response to water scarcity has been one of cooperation and innovation. Having said that, increasing inter-annual variability in the flow of the waters of the river and the consequent increase in instances of floods and droughts, coupled with a rise in the willingness and ability of upstream countries to challenge Egypt’s hegemonic status in addition to the demographic changes mentioned earlier will certainly test the basin countries’ capacity for cooperation, innovation and adaptation. This will ultimately be crucial in determining the state of relations among them and the future of their populations with respect to water.
  • Topic: International Organization, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Publication Date: 12-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Aspen Institute
  • Abstract: Since its inception in 2010, AIHSG has enjoyed a close relationship with the Secretary of Homeland Security and the rest of the department's senior leadership team. We commend former Secretary Johnson for his service to the nation and the progress the department made during his tenure. We congratulate Secretary Kelly on his nomination and confirmation, and look forward to working with him and his senior leadership team in the years ahead
  • Topic: Global Security
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Daniel S. Hamilton, Muhammad Al-Ubayadi
  • Publication Date: 06-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: The Combating Terrorism Center at West Point
  • Abstract: This report examines the Islamic State’s self-reported military activities in 16 cities, 11 in Iraq and five in Syria. From each city’s date of liberation from the Islamic State until April 2017, the Islamic State reported that it carried out 1,468 separate attacks in these 16 cities. The volume of military operations in these cities provides evidence for the idea that the Islamic State, once relegated in Iraq to guerilla warfare from 2003-2011, may be returning to this form of existence in Iraq and Syria. However, this activity is not uniform across each of the cities. As the coalition edges closer to taking formal control of Mosul and Raqqa back from the Islamic State, this report highlights trends in the data to provide additional insight for those planning and implementing post-liberation security, reconstruction, and governance plans.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Brian Dodwell, Daniel S. Hamilton, Don Rassler
  • Publication Date: 01-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: The Combating Terrorism Center at West Point
  • Abstract: Using two different sets of data derived from internal, bureaucratic documents produced by the Islamic State (and its predecessor group) during two distinct periods of time (2006-2007 and 2011-2014), this report evaluates how the make-up, scale, and scope of the Iraq- and Syria-bound foreign fighter problem has changed over the last decade. It does so across three dimensions. First, it outlines the similarities and differences that exist in the backgrounds of the foreign fighters who joined the Islamic State during separate blocks of time. Second, it provides insight into the local travel and flow of foreign fighters across time as well as the mobilization infrastructure that the Islamic State had in place to facilitate the travel of recruits into Syria or Iraq. Third, it details changes in the preferences of foreign fighters, as reflected by the roles they wanted to fill within the organization.
  • Topic: International Affairs, Military Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Arie Perlinger, Daniel S. Hamilton
  • Publication Date: 01-2017
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: The Combating Terrorism Center at West Point
  • Abstract: In April 2016, the CTC released a major report on Islamic State foreign fighters. This report, based on over 4,000 leaked personnel records, gave an interesting inside look at who the group was able to bring into the organization and also how the group was trying to manage the large number of recruits. The Combating Terrorism Center is pleased to announce the release of another major report on foreign fighters. This report, From Cradle to Grave: The Lifecycle of Foreign Fighters in Iraq and Syria, breaks down the experience (or lifecycle) of foreign fighters into three stages: pre-departure, in theater, and return. However, because the personnel records used in the previous report do not speak to each of these stages, this report then uses open-source reporting on these fighters to code variables in each of these different stages. Using a dataset of nearly 1,200 foreign fighters from mostly Western Europe and North America, this report offers a more holistic examination of what the fighter flows look like, but also what challenges policymakers and practitioners will face as they continue to deal with this enduring and complicated problem.
  • Topic: International Affairs, Military Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus