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  • Author: Christopher J. Lamb
  • Publication Date: 05-2016
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: National Defense University Press
  • Abstract: There is strong bipartisan support for Section 941 of the Senate’s version of the National Defense Authorization Act for 2017, which requires the Pentagon to use cross-functional teams (CFTs). CFTs are a popular organizational construct with a reputation for delivering better and faster solutions for complex and rapidly evolving problems. The Department of Defense reaction to the bill has been strongly negative. Senior officials argue that Section 941 would “undermine the authority of the Secretary, add bureaucracy, and confuse lines of responsibility.” The Senate’s and Pentagon’s diametrically opposed positions on the value of CFTs can be partially reconciled with a better understanding of what CFTs are, how cross-functional groups have performed to date in the Pentagon, and their prerequisites for success. This paper argues there is strong evidence that CFTs could provide impressive benefits if the teams were conceived and employed correctly.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Publication Date: 02-2016
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: The Carter Center
  • Abstract: Founded in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, The Carter Center is guided by a fundamental commitment to human rights and the alleviation of suffering. To this end, the Center has sought to wage peace, advance freedom and democracy, and improve health worldwide. As part of these efforts, The Carter Center has enhanced the quality of democratic governance by conducting activities in several areas, including strengthening human rights institutions, combating political corruption, advancing transparent governance, and observing elections
  • Topic: International Affairs, Democracy
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Boyan Boyanov
  • Publication Date: 11-2016
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Institute for Security and International Studies (ISIS)
  • Abstract: After Pyongyang conducted its fourth nuclear test on the 5th of January 2016 and declared it a successful experiment with a hydrogen bomb, the international community resumed its appeals for finding a definitive solution to the issue with North Korea’s nuclear arsenal. What impresses is the routine of the international response following the North Korean habitual act of defying the nuclear nonproliferation system: diplomatic condemnation mostly coming from the United States, South Korea, Japan, and, in a far more restrained manner – from China. When Pyongyang launched a satellite in space two days later, Seoul responded by shutting down the Kaesong industrial complex – a mutually beneficial industrial zone where South Korean companies employ North Korean labor1 . Even this seemingly harsh action does not constitute a precedent. At that time it was not very demanding to foretell the execution of consequential U.S. – South Korea military drills to display the U.S. resolution to be constantly involved in whatever is happening on the Korean Peninsula and to dismay the latest great leader of the North.
  • Topic: International Security, International Affairs, Nuclear Power
  • Political Geography: North Korea
  • Author: Kevin Rudd
  • Publication Date: 04-2015
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Asia Society
  • Abstract: The future relationship between China and the United States represents one of the great mega-changes and mega-challenges of our age. Unlike other such changes, the consequences of China’s rise are unfolding gradually, sometimes purposefully, but most of the time imperceptibly while the world’s attention is drawn to more dramatic events elsewhere. With the rise of China, we are observing the geopolitical equivalent of the melting of the polar ice caps. Slowly the ice thins, cracks appear and one day a large sheet of ice spectac- ularly peels away. If captured on camera, the world momentarily sits up and pays attention before CNN returns our gaze to the drama of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant’s most recent atrocity.
  • Topic: International Relations, International Cooperation, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: China, America
  • Publication Date: 12-2015
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: East View Information Services
  • Abstract: Russian World special
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Russia
  • Author: A. Kortunov, A. Frolov
  • Publication Date: 12-2015
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: East View Information Services
  • Abstract: The U.S. foreign policy today has fallen on hard times. The world is entering a new era with a lot of totally new challenges, including untraditional challenges that the U.S. leadership is faced with. In some instances, Washington manages to fit into ongoing processes while in others, the situation starts to follow a different scenario and then this policy, which is based on a number of important and fundamental principles, begins to founder.
  • Topic: International Relations, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: America
  • Author: D. Malysheva
  • Publication Date: 12-2015
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: East View Information Services
  • Abstract: ON JULY 26, 2015, President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin on board the frigate Admiral of the Soviet Navy Gorshkov endorsed a new version of the Maritime Doctrine of the Russian Federation, the basic document that specifies Russia’s naval and maritime policy. This version added the Mediterranean to the areas of the national maritime policy (the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific zones) and specified that Russia’s naval pres- ence there is aimed at “turning it into the zone of military-political sta- bility and good-neighborly relations.”1 This is not fortuitous: The region is one of the main zones of Russia’s politics and international coopera- tion. Time has come to sort out regional developments, varied interests of the states involved and the problems they have to cope with. In other words, we should arrive at a clear idea about the region’s importance for the Russian Federation.
  • Topic: International Cooperation, International Affairs, Geopolitics
  • Political Geography: Russia
  • Author: Ian Dudgeon
  • Publication Date: 12-2015
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Australian Institute of International Affairs
  • Abstract: Any assessment of the multitude of dynamics that contribute to the ongoing regional stability in the Middle East requires an understanding of the factors that motivate the perceptions and actions of each state and other non-state actors. Iran and its neighbours, the Islamic State (IS) and the Sunnis and Shiite sects of Islam are all stakeholders in this mix, and in shaping any solution that contributes to regional peace and stability.
  • Topic: International Security, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Iran
  • Author: Melissa Conley Tyler
  • Publication Date: 12-2015
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Australian Institute of International Affairs
  • Abstract: The Australian Institute of International Affairs (AIIA) was established in 1924 to promote public understanding and interest in international affairs. The AIIA works actively to engage younger people in its work by coordinating events such as careers fairs, school events, mentoring, internships and a Young Diplomats Program. As part of the AIIA’s commitment to engage young people, AIIA National Office launched an internship program in 2006 that has hosted more than 150 interns to date. Internship opportunities also exist in all AIIA state and territory offices. Anyone who has served as an intern at the AIIA is eligible to submit a paper for publication in Emerging Scholars.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Australia
  • Author: Luis Ayala Cañón
  • Publication Date: 11-2015
  • Content Type: Special Report
  • Institution: Fundación Alternativas
  • Abstract: Contexto y objetivos: El I Informe sobre la Desigualdad en España de la Fundación Alternativas, publicado en 2013, recogía una situación preocupante sobre la evolución de la desigualdad social. Por un lado, las diferencias económicas entre los hogares dejaron de reducirse a comienzos de los años noventa y la fase de crecimiento económico anterior a la reciente crisis no consiguió que éstas disminuyeran. Por otro lado, la caída de la actividad económica y la destrucción del empleo que comenzó en 2007 elevaron los indicadores a niveles desconocidos desde hacía décadas. En el momento actual, en el que ya se vislumbra una cierta mejoría de las condiciones macroeconómicas y, con mayor lentitud, del empleo, no parece que las desigualdades hayan disminuido. Por el contrario, la información más reciente muestra, inequívocamente, que el crecimiento de la desigualdad no se ha frenado. En este contexto, resulta de sumo interés la pregunta sobre el papel que han tenido las prestaciones sociales y los impuestos en el crecimiento de la desigualdad para entender cómo pueden prevenirla en el futuro. La respuesta a esta pregunta ha constituido el objetivo del II Informe sobre la Desigualdad en España 2015 cuyo eje conductor ha sido tratar de vincular los procesos de desigualdad existentes con las principales políticas del Estado de Bienestar.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Spain