Search

You searched for: Content Type Journal Article Remove constraint Content Type: Journal Article Political Geography Europe Remove constraint Political Geography: Europe
Number of results to display per page

Search Results

  • Author: Lewis E. Lehrman
  • Publication Date: 07-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The Cato Journal
  • Institution: The Cato Institute
  • Abstract: To evaluate the history of the Federal Reserve System, we cannot help but wonder, whither the Fed? and to consider wherefore its reform—even what and how to do it. But first let us remember whence we came one century ago.
  • Topic: War
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: James A. Dorn
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The Cato Journal
  • Institution: The Cato Institute
  • Abstract: This article deals with the main problems and proposed solutions with respect to the euro. I start with what I perceive to be confusion in the debate on the euro. The next section shows a large variation in the growth performance in the eurozone, and more broadly in the European Union (EU). This should make us skeptical when hearing about the crisis of the euro, or of Europe. I then proceed to discuss what the problem countries in the eurozone suffer from. The next section deals with a more difficult question: What are the links between the euro architecture and the accumulation of these problems—that is, the imbalances and structural barriers to economic growth in some members of the eurozone? I then proceed to discuss the adjustment under the euro after 2008, focusing on the weaknesses of the policies of the crisis management. The article ends with a critical discussion of the problems and solutions put forward in the debate on the euro.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Achim Hurrelmann
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: ACHIM HURRELMANN looks at lessons that could be drawn from the European Union about the democratization of other non-state entities. He argues that the EU's non-state character is no insurmountable obstacle to democratization. The “democratic deficit” of the European Union is rooted in the institutional design of its multilevel system and is further influenced by limited and uninformed citizen participation in EU politics.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Stephen M. Walt
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Ethics & International Affairs
  • Institution: Carnegie Council
  • Abstract: Special Responsibilities: Global Problems and American Power, Mlada Bukovansky, Ian Clark, Robyn Eckersley, Richard Price, Christian Reus-Smit, and Nicholas Wheeler (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), 290 pp., $29.99 paper. Former secretary of state Madeleine Albright famously described the United States as the “indispensable nation,” entitled to lead because it “sees further than others do.” She was one of the many government officials who believed their country had “special responsibilities,” and was therefore different in some way from other states. Such claims are sometimes made to rally domestic support for some costly international action; at other times they are used to exempt a great power from norms or constraints that weaker states are expected to follow.
  • Topic: Government
  • Political Geography: United States, America, Europe
  • Author: James W. Nickel
  • Publication Date: 08-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Ethics & International Affairs
  • Institution: Carnegie Council
  • Abstract: Like people born shortly after World War II, the international human rights movement recently had its sixty-fifth birthday. This could mean that retirement is at hand and that death will come in a few decades. After all, the formulations of human rights that activists, lawyers, and politicians use today mostly derive from the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the world in 1948 was very different from our world today: the cold war was about to break out, communism was a strong and optimistic political force in an expansionist phase, and Western Europe was still recovering from the war. The struggle against entrenched racism and sexism had only just begun, decolonization was in its early stages, and Asia was still poor (Japan was under military reconstruction, and Mao's heavy-handed revolution in China was still in the future). Labor unions were strong in the industrialized world, and the movement of women into work outside the home and farm was in its early stages. Farming was less technological and usually on a smaller scale, the environmental movement had not yet flowered, and human-caused climate change was present but unrecognized. Personal computers and social networking were decades away, and Earth's human population was well under three billion.
  • Topic: Climate Change, Human Rights, Human Welfare, International Law, International Political Economy, Sovereignty, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: United States, Japan, China, Europe, Asia, United Nations
  • Author: Andrew Gilmour
  • Publication Date: 08-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Ethics & International Affairs
  • Institution: Carnegie Council
  • Abstract: Ever since the Charter of the United Nations was signed in 1945, human rights have constituted one of its three pillars, along with peace and development. As noted in a dictum coined during the World Summit of 2005: "There can be no peace without development, no development without peace, and neither without respect for human rights." But while progress has been made in all three domains, it is with respect to human rights that the organization's performance has experienced some of its greatest shortcomings. Not coincidentally, the human rights pillar receives only a fraction of the resources enjoyed by the other two—a mere 3 percent of the general budget.
  • Topic: Climate Change, Human Rights, Human Welfare, International Law, International Political Economy, Sovereignty, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Europe, United Nations
  • Author: Jens Bartelson
  • Publication Date: 08-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Ethics & International Affairs
  • Institution: Carnegie Council
  • Abstract: Sovereignty apparently never ceases to attract scholarly attention. Long gone are the days when its meaning was uncontested and its essential attributes could be safely taken for granted by international theorists. During the past decades international relations scholars have increasingly emphasized the historical contingency of sovereignty and the mutability of its corresponding institutions and practices, yet these accounts have been limited to the changing meaning and function of sovereignty within the international system. This focus has served to reinforce some of the most persistent myths about the origin of sovereignty, and has obscured questions about the diffusion of sovereignty outside the European context.
  • Topic: Climate Change, Human Rights, Human Welfare, International Law, International Political Economy, Sovereignty, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Sir Richard Jolly
  • Publication Date: 09-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Ethics & International Affairs
  • Institution: Carnegie Council
  • Abstract: As of 2007 the world economy has been caught in the worst crisis since the 1930s. Yet after two years of only partly successful efforts to mobilize and coordinate global action of financial control and stimulus, ending with the G-20 meeting of March 2009, responsibility for corrective economic initiatives has essentially been left to individual countries, supported by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the European Union (EU). Moreover, such support has been usually conditional on countries following financial policies of tough austerity. The United States took some actions to stimulate its economy, but by many accounts these were insufficient. Most of Europe has not even attempted stimulus measures and has been in a period of economic stagnation, with falling real incomes among the poorest parts of the population. Although some signs of “recovery” have been heralded in 2013 and 2014, growth has mostly been measured from a lower base. There is little evidence of broad-based economic recovery, let alone improvements in the situation of the poor or even of the middle-income groups.
  • Topic: Economics, Governance
  • Political Geography: United States, Europe, Asia
  • Author: James Bohman
  • Publication Date: 09-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Ethics & International Affairs
  • Institution: Carnegie Council
  • Abstract: In Just Freedom, Philip Pettit undertakes significant revisions of some of his republican commitments. The book has many new and innovative ideas, but most of all this work sharpens Pettit's thinking on the role of democracy in republicanism, and on the often positive interaction between the two. Above all, it seems to me that Pettit's own account of basic freedoms has become broader and wider, and now includes a cosmopolitan conception of what we owe other human beings, whoever they are.
  • Topic: Politics
  • Political Geography: United States, Europe
  • Author: David Stevenson
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Affairs
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: In what follows I will begin in Houghton Street and from there will broaden outwards in successive circles, from London in the 1920s to Europe in 1914, to the Caribbean Sea in 1962, and to where we find ourselves today. The reasons for so doing will, I trust, become clear. But my focus will be on the origin and applications of the discipline of international history, through an investigation of the Stevenson Chair around which the LSE International History Department grew up; the LSE becoming in turn one of the nuclei from which the subject would spread further, both elsewhere in Britain and overseas. I will underline the practical purposes of the discipline's creators, while highlighting a tension between two intellectual traditions that were present from the outset. I will emphasize the need to synthesize those traditions if the study of international history is to yield the maximum insight and value.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Harold James
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Affairs
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: A spectre is haunting the world: 1914. The approaching centenary of the outbreak of the First World War is a reminder of how the instability produced by changes in the relative balance of power in an integrated or globalized world may produce cataclysmic events. Jean-Claude Juncker, the veteran Prime Minister of Luxem-bourg and chair of the Eurogroup of finance ministers, started 2013 by warning journalists that they should take note of the parallels with 1913, the last year of European peace. He was referring explicitly to new national animosities fanned by the European economic crisis, with a growing polarization between North and South. Historically, the aftermath and the consequences of such cataclysms have been extreme. George Kennan strikingly termed the 1914–18 conflict 'the great seminal catastrophe of this century'. Without it, fascism, communism, the Great Depression and the Second World War are all almost impossible to imagine.
  • Topic: Conflict Resolution, Communism, Economics, Politics, War
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Margaret MacMillan
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Affairs
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: A century ago this autumn the first battle of the Marne ended Germany's attempt to crush France and its ally Britain quickly. In that one battle alone the French lost 80,000 dead and the Germans approximately the same. By comparison, 47,000 Americans died in the whole of the Vietnam War and 4,800 coalition troops in the invasion and occupation of Iraq. In August and September 1914 Europe, the most powerful and prosperous part of the world, had begun the process of destroying itself. A minor crisis in its troubled backyard of the Balkans had escalated with terrifying speed to create an all-out war between the powers. 1 'Again and ever I thank God for the Atlantic Ocean,' wrote Walter Page, the American ambassador in London; and in Washington his president, Woodrow Wilson, agreed.
  • Topic: War
  • Political Geography: Britain, Iraq, America, Europe, Washington, France, London, Vietnam, Germany, Balkans, Atlantic Ocean
  • Author: Richard Reid
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Affairs
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: This article was commissioned as a contribution to the 90th anniversary issue of International Affairs , and it seems appropriate to note at the outset the prominent place that Africa has occupied in the pages of the journal since the 1920s. Indeed, a list of authors who have written for it reads as a roll-call of modern African history, in terms of both protagonists and analysts, and I doubt whether any specialist Africanist journal can boast a comparable line-up. A handful of examples may suffice. From the era of European colonial rule, Frederick, Lord Lugard, wrote in 1927 on the putative challenges confronting colonial administrators of 'equatorial' Africa, and Lord Hailey, in 1947, on the issues involved in 'native administration' more broadly; notably, the African perspective on these questions was provided in a piece in 1951 by the eminent Tswana political figure of the early and middle twentieth century, Tshekedi Khama. Former colonial governor Sir Andrew Cohen assessed the place of the new African nations within the UN in a 1960 article. A later generation of African nationalist leaders, the founders and shapers of the continent in its first flush of independence, is also represented: of particular note are pieces on the prospects for the continent by the Tunisian leader Habib Bourguiba and by the Senegalese poet and politician Leopold Senghor, in 1961 and 1962 respectively. And then there are the analysts and commentators, some of whom have become the stuff of legend for the author's own generation: Lucy Mair, Ali Mazrui and Colin Legum, to name but three.
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Africa, Europe
  • Author: Mark Webber, Ellen Hallams, Martin A. Smith
  • Publication Date: 07-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Affairs
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: When NATO heads of state and government convene in Newport, Wales, in September 2014, it will be their first meeting in the UK since the London summit of July 1990. A quarter of a century ago, NATO was reborn. The London Declaration on a Transformed Alliance was NATO's keynote statement of renewed purpose, issued in 1990 as the Cold War was drawing to a close. In it we find the beginnings of the tasks which would come to define the alliance in the post- Cold War period, along with an appreciation of a fundamentally altered strategic landscape. Europe had 'entered a new, promising era', one in which it was thought the continent's tragic cycle of war and peace might well be over. The 2014 summit communiqué is unlikely to reflect such optimism, but what it surely needs to do is to recapture the spirit of enterprise that NATO has on occasion been able to articulate in demanding times.
  • Topic: NATO, Cold War
  • Political Geography: United Kingdom, Europe, London
  • Author: Malcolm Chalmers
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The World Today
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: Britain's 2010 National Security Strategy, published shortly after the coalition government took office, was entitled 'A Strong Britain in an Age of Uncertainty'. It made no mention of the two existential challenges—the possible secession of Scotland from the United Kingdom, and the risk of a British withdrawal from the European Union. Yet either event would be a fundamental transformation in the very nature of the British state, with profound impact on its foreign and security policy.
  • Topic: Security, Government
  • Political Geography: Britain, United Kingdom, Europe, Scotland
  • Author: Ana Stanic
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The World Today
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: Diversification of gas supply has been a strategic priority for the European Union since its dependence on imports began to grow in the early 2000s. The crisis in Ukraine has heightened concerns that the flow of Russian gas passing through this country may be interrupted and has reignited calls for dependency on Russian gas to be reduced. As a new European Commission takes over energy policy in Brussels, it is worth examining the lessons the EU ought to learn from the Southern Gas Corridor project, which for a decade was seen as key to enhancing energy security.
  • Topic: Security
  • Political Geography: Russia, Europe, Brazil
  • Author: Nicholas Westcott
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The World Today
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: Summits with Africa are in fashion: in August, President Obama hosted America's first; in April, the European Union staged the fourth EU-Africa summit in Brussels; the BRICS countries–Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa–held one in Durban in March last year; and in June 2013 Japan hosted its five-yearly conference on African development in Yokohama. Next year will see the sixth China-Africa summit. South America, South Korea and Turkey, which have all held summits with African leaders in recent years, have pledged return matches in Africa.
  • Political Geography: Africa, America, Europe
  • Author: Thomas Raines
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The World Today
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: British attitudes to the European Union have become generally more favourable over the past two years, according to a YouGov poll for Chatham House. Those who say they would vote to stay in the EU now have the narrowest of leads–40 per cent to 39 per cent. Two years ago, 49 per cent said they would vote to leave, against 30 per cent to stay.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The World Today
  • Institution: Chatham House
  • Abstract: Danny Dorling's book is presented as an opportunity to explore the cost of the growing disparity between the very richest in society and the rest. What results, however, is an attempt to correlate facts and figures to much broader societal trends, but not always with justification.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: David A. Andelman
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: World Policy Journal
  • Institution: World Policy Institute
  • Abstract: At noon on August 10, 1978, I arrived at the frontier between Austria and Czechoslovakia in my rickety old Opel sedan that was The New York Times bureau car. I'd driven up from Belgrade, where I was then based, covering an Eastern Europe thoroughly in the grip of communism. Now, when I arrived at the frontier, I steeled myself. I was about to pass through what Winston Churchill had 32 years earlier dubbed the Iron Curtain, separating East from West. These were difficult times. Communism and capitalism were very much at each others' throats, and there was no more extreme a contrast than in some of these heavily-fortified border points where the favored few could cross in both directions, provided they had all the right papers. Indeed, I had my American passport, my Czechoslovak visa, a fistful of dollars, my notebooks, and some background material, from which I had carefully expunged any Czech contacts and sliced off the letterhead of Radio Free Europe Research, the virulently anti-communist, American-backed propaganda source, that would likely have landed me in hot water with the ever-vigilant border police.
  • Political Geography: New York, Europe
  • Publication Date: 06-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: World Policy Journal
  • Institution: World Policy Institute
  • Abstract: Pocket change-mountains of it can shape or re-shape society, politics, and most certainly the economy. The rise and fall of governments, democracies, and tyrannies are all too often at the mercy of the ebb and flow of plain, hard cash. Currencies today are very much the defining feature of nations, individually and collectively. A flailing and fragmented Europe seeks to hang together-retain its global reach-on the strength of a single currency that has taken on a life or neardeath of its own, its very existence becoming an end in itself. Across Africa and Asia, the Americas north and south, continents and peoples are all too often held hostage by forces unleashed in the name of money. It is this kaleidoscope of silver, gold, and paper, often in the magnitude of tsunamis, that we set out to explore in the Summer issue of World Policy Journal.
  • Political Geography: Africa, America, Europe, Asia
  • Author: David A. Andelman
  • Publication Date: 09-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: World Policy Journal
  • Institution: World Policy Institute
  • Abstract: On Saturday, October 1, 1977, I arrived in Belgrade to take up my post as East European bureau chief of The New York Times. I'd timed my arrival to coincide with the opening of the conference of the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE), one of many efforts during the depths of the Cold War to facilitate dialogue between East and West—the two halves of a very much divided, and at times hostile, Europe.
  • Political Geography: New York, Europe
  • Author: Thomas Wright
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The Washington Quarterly
  • Institution: Center for Strategic and International Studies
  • Abstract: If there is one idea that has consistently influenced western foreign policy since the Cold War, it is the notion that extending interdependence and tightening economic integration among nations is a positive development that advances peace, stability, and prosperity. As a post-Cold War idea guiding U.S. and European foreign policy, there is much to be said for it. The absorption of Eastern Europe in both the European Union and NATO helped consolidate market democracy. Globalization led to unprecedented growth in western economies, and facilitated the ascent of China and India, among others, taking billions of people out of poverty. Access to the international financial institutions also offered emerging powers the strategic option of exerting influence through existing institutions rather than trying to overturn them. Some policymakers and experts believe that this process holds the key to continuing great power peace and stability.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, Cold War
  • Political Geography: United States, China, Europe, India
  • Author: Michael O'Hanlon
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The Washington Quarterly
  • Institution: Center for Strategic and International Studies
  • Abstract: During the Cold War, the United States varied between a "1 ½ war" and a "2 ½ war" framework for sizing its main combat forces. This framework prepared forces for one or two large wars, and then a smaller "half-war." Capacity for a major conflict in Europe, against the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies, represented the enduring big war potential. This period saw simultaneous conflict against China as a second possible big war, until Nixon's Guam doctrine placed a greater burden on regional allies rather than U.S. forces to address such a specter, and until his subsequent opening to the PRC made such a war seem less likely in any event. The half-wars were seen as relatively more modest but still quite significant operations such as in Korea or Vietnam.
  • Topic: Cold War
  • Political Geography: United States, China, Europe, Vietnam, Korea
  • Author: Thierry Balzacq
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: L'élargissement de décembre 2004 a soulevé, pour l'UE, des questions stratégiques redoutables. Comment canaliser – et endiguer – les aspirations des uns et des autres à l'adhésion, sans compromettre la qualité des relations qu'elle souhaite entretenir avec les nouveaux Etats voisins ? Comment, dans ces conditions, construire une communauté de sécurité pluraliste à l'intérieur de l'espace de l'Union, sans que les voisins ne se sentent exclus ou – ce qui charrie des conséquences similaires – menacés ? Enfin, comment impliquer ces derniers dans la gestion des questions cruciales pour l'UE (immigration illégale, crime organisé, terrorisme, énergie) sans que cela ne soit vécu comme de l'ingérence ? De telles questions ne sont évidemment pas neutres par rapport à l'idée plus ou moins précise de ce que l'UE voudrait être, bien qu'elles ne se confondent pas avec elle. En effet, pour le dire autrement, l'élargissement n'a pas fait qu'intégrer de nouveaux Etats-membres, elle a aussi eu pour résultat immédiat d'instituer des lignes de séparation inédites et, par la suite, de porter les frontières externes de l'Union, à l'Est essentiellement, au contact d'une constellation de voisins jugés différents du point de vue économique, social et politique.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Ruben Zaiotti
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: La sécurité est un élément central de la Politique européenne de voisinage (PEV), une initiative récente de l'Union européenne à l'attention des pays qui, depuis la dernière vague d'élargissement de l'Union, se trouvent désormais aux frontières extérieures de l'Europe 1. L'objectif affiché de la PEV est en fait d'établir, autour des bordures de l'Europe, un « "cercle d'amis" – caractérisé par des relations étroites et pacifiques fondées sur la coopération 2 ». En d'autres termes, l'Europe rêve de la création d'une « communauté de sécurité 3 » pan régionale. Pour y parvenir, la PEV s'est dotée d'une série de mesures ayant pour but de protéger l'UE et ses voisins de menaces communes comme le terrorisme, l'immigration clandestine et le trafic de stupéfiants. Ces mesures sont toutefois présentées comme corollaires à la principale motivation qui voudrait que la PEV garantisse que cette communauté de sécurité devienne une réalité, notamment la promesse faite aux voisins de leur offrir un accès élargi au marché commun.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Sarah Wolff
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Au lendemain de la fin de la Guerre froide, les phénomènes de la « déterritorialisation » des menaces ainsi que de la reconceptualisation de la notion de frontières accompagnaient une transformation du concept de sécurité européenne. La globalisation et la transnationalisation des menaces ont en effet provoqué une altération progressive des notions de frontières intérieures et extérieures. Les frontières contemporaines, produit de constructions sociales et de cadres cognitifs, sont le résultat de l'émergence de nouvelles communautés sécuritaires qui dressent de nouvelles frontières entre « insiders » et « outsiders » Les entités géographiques comme l'Europe définissent leurs frontières selon leur propres perceptions et pratiques sécuritaires. Cela a conduit à l'apparition de nouveaux discours qui « ne font plus la distinction entre sécurité intérieure et sécurité extérieure », et se caractérisent par une vision large de la notion de sécurité, y incluant les questions énergétiques, les droits de l'Homme, les questions migratoires mais également le crime organisé.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Olivier Cahn
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Procéder à l'étude d'une décision de justice cinq ans après qu'elle a été rendue ne fait pas sens a priori . Cependant, deux motifs justifient de passer outre cette réserve. En premier lieu, un ouvrage publié récemment contient une anazlyse de cet arrêt qui confirme que, faute pour ce dernier d'avoir jusqu'à présent fait l'objet d'un commentaire par la doctrine française, l'appréhension de son apport et de ses implications demeure largement erronée En second lieu, et de manière plus déterminante, envisagée dans une perspective contemporaine et à la lumière d'éléments récents, il apparaît que cet arrêt présente une actualité pro- pre à alimenter, non la polémique, mais bien la réflexion. Il participe en effet d'une critique du traitement réservé par l'institution judiciaire française à l'acti- vité des services de police qui conserve sa pertinence et son acuité.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Georges-Henri Bricet des Vallons
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Apparue aux Etats-Unis dans les années 1960-1970, dans un contexte marqué par l'émergence des masses contestataires et des mouvements de défense des droits civiques, la théorie de la non-létalité a gagné à partir du début des années 1990 une place centrale dans la réflexion militaire sur les conflits asymétriques et la guerre urbaine. La mise en service à titre d'expérimentation en 2006 en Irak, dans le cadre de la politique de contre-insurrection, d'armes comme le Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) et l' Active Denial System (ADS) a signé une étape primordiale dans le développement de systèmes antipersonnels de nouvelle génération. L'apparition de ces armes à énergie dirigée amène à s'interroger sur la nature de la révolution scientifique et stratégique que tente de promouvoir la théorie de la non-létalité.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Jean-Paul Hanon
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: La restructuration des polices en Allemagne depuis le milieu des années 1990 et, parallèlement, la redéfinition des missions de la Bundeswehr constituent les développements marquants d'une politique étrangère allemande qui s'inscrit délibérément dans le cadre plus général de la politique européenne de sécurité commune, avec cependant quelques interrogations remarquables.
  • Topic: Politics
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Salvatore Palidda
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Les missions militaires italiennes à l'étranger au cours de ces dernières années peuvent être considérées comme un « fait politique total ». Elles sont en effet caractérisées et marquées par l'entrelacement de multiples aspects et acteurs de la société italienne ainsi que de leurs relations avec l'extérieur. Elles sont ainsi révélatrices des mutations économiques et politiques que ce pays a connues depuis la fin des années 1970. Nombre de ces aspects et acteurs, ainsi que les multiples interactions en jeu (directes et indirectes), ne sont pas évidents à analyser, les éléments empiriques nécessaires à une étude sociologique approfondie n'étant pas toujours disponibles. En effet, il s'agit d'un univers d'activités qui oscillent entre le public et le secret, et parfois même entre le légal et l'illégal (voir infra ). Par ailleurs, les perspectives interprétatives et d'analyse pour la recherche dans ce domaine ne semblent pas encore suffisamment adaptées aux changements qui se sont succédés depuis le début des années 1980 et davantage encore au cours de ces dernières années. En effet, les conséquences de la « Révolution dans les affaires militaires » (RAM), de la révolution technologique et du développement néo-libéral ont provoqué une prolifération et une hybridation de différents éléments et acteurs qu'il n'est pas toujours facile d'appréhender au travers d'un cadre d'analyse unitaire Cela est d'autant plus vrai que, si le développement des activités économiques et surtout financières des acteurs italiens à l'étranger sont apparemment tout à fait indépendantes des affaires militaires, les choix dans ce dernier domaine semblent pourtant de plus en plus conditionnés par les premières (et cela ne concerne pas seulement le marché des armements).
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Manon Jendly
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Cest principalement au nom de l'ordre et de la sécurité que se sont multipliés au fil des ans les centres de rétention administrative. Ces lieux de contrainte n'ont jamais cessé de se développer sous une pluralité de formes distinctes, depuis leur apparition au début du XIX e siècle et leur généralisation durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. De nos jours, il apparaît que ces centres procèdent principalement d'une politique systématique d'exclusion, synonyme, le cas échéant, d'expulsion, qui inscrit notamment la figure de cet autre – l'étranger – au cour des préoccupations nationales des sociétés occidentales. L'intérêt de l'ouvrage ici recensé est de nous rappeler, par ses dimensions sociopolitiques et historico-juridiques, la propension de nos gouvernements à recourir davantage à l'internement administratif et, simultanément, l'inertie de notre conscience collective à s'emporter contre le caractère arbitraire et autarcique de cette pratique, réminiscence d'une mise au ban à durée indéterminée.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Didier Bigo
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Ce numéro de Cultures Conflits n'est pas un numéro thématique, contrairement à notre habitude. Néanmoins, malgré l'hétérogénéité de contributions venant de divers colloques et de textes proposés spontanément à la revue, il existe une sorte de fil d'Ariane qui court entre les articles et qui est sans doute le reflet du monde contemporain ainsi que des préoccupations de nombre de chercheurs quant aux implications de certaines pratiques sur les libertés contemporaines. Ce fil d'Ariane concerne la circulation des personnes, leur droit et leur capacité de mouvement à l'échelle internationale, leur liberté et leur désir de bouger ou de pouvoir rester sur place, et la volonté de contrôle des gouvernements – y compris démocratiques –de tracer les mouvements browniens de ces individus, de filtrer et trier ceux qui sont désirables et ceux qui sont indésirables, de recenser et garder en mémoire ces mouvements. Cela a pour but non seulement de fixer dans les bases de données le rapport que chaque individu a avec la circulation transfrontalière, mais aussi d'en tirer des leçons afin de construire des profils de personnalités, inconnues mais néanmoins considérées par analogie avec d'autres cas, comme présentant des risques : risques à la santé publique, à l'économie et aux bénéfices sociaux reçus par les citoyens et les personnes régulièrement entrées sur le territoire d'un Etat, à la sécurité publique. Ce risque, construit comme un calcul rationnel évaluant le comportement d'individus inconnus à travers des critères de dangerosité, analysé ex-post, à partir de cas précis du passé, tend à structurer une volonté de contrôle du futur des mouvements individuels, une volonté d'anticipation des trajectoires avant même qu'elles ne se réalisent. Le caractère hautement hasardeux de telles spéculations sur l'avenir de la part des agences de sécurité ou des acteurs privés qui les élaborent, de même que les doutes sur la validité du savoir qui constitue ces catégories, en particulier lorsque l'on cherche à déduire à partir de caractéristiques corporelles les comportements ou même les idées d'un individu donné, et encore plus d'un individu idéal typique construit comme matrice du danger potentiel, sont la plupart du temps mis de côté, « suspendus » au nom de l'urgence à faire quelque chose, à agir avant qu'il ne soit trop tard ; la scientificité apparente des moyens masquant la dimension astrologique des spéculations qui ont fondé ces analyses de risque où le « mythe est dense dans la science ». La tentative de réduire le futur à un futur antérieur et, dès lors, un futur lisible et connu, à partir duquel « prévenir » le pire, est sans doute le rationale ou la logique diagramatique qui traverse les différents dispositifs de pouvoir contemporain qui sont ici étudiés dans leurs spécificités. Ils ne conduisent pas tous et tout le temps à des pratiques d'exception, à des dérogations permettant à des formes intrusives de surveillance et de contrôle de se développer. Certains dispositifs sont même appelés de leurs voeux par des individus qui se sentent en permanence en situation de peur ou tout du moins d'inquiétude et dont les repères traditionnels sont changés par les transformations globales contemporaines concernant le marché du travail, les inégalités sociales, la formation de groupes d'experts. La surveillance des mouvements sous forme anticipatrice peut alors être réclamée par tous, en particulier par ceux qui pensent qu'ils n'en seront pas l'objet parce qu'ils bougent peu ou parce qu'elle ne s'appliquerait qu'aux autres, aux étrangers. La complicité active aux chaînes de servitude évoquée par La Boétie est bien actuelle, et elles se sont maintenant élargies à une demande d'auto-surveillance concernant non seulement les documents traçant les mouvements et les passages de frontières, mais aussi les corps eux-mêmes des sujets. Il en résulte un appesantissement de la surveillance et du contrôle des corps qui va au-delà des contrôles aux frontières, des visas et de la police à distance et qui s'institue à travers une nouvelle relation entre identifiants biométriques (toujours plus interne et non modifiable par l'individu) et instantanéité des échanges d'information entre bases de données informatiques interopérables à l'échelle, sinon mondiale, du moins transatlanti- que, tout au moins pour un certain nombre de services chargés du renseignement et de la lutte contre la violence politique, le crime et, de plus en plus, les irrégularités de passage des frontières. Quand cet appesantissement de la surveillance au nom de la prévention s'opérationnalise dans des contrôles a priori s'appuyant sur des logiques de suspicion portant sur des groupes particuliers, marqués par leurs appartenances religieuses, ethniques ou minoritaires et par leurs motivations idéologiques, il débouche souvent sur des pratiques illibérales, visant à s'extraire des règles élémentaires de contrôle démocratique, et débouche sur ces archipels d'exception qui sont à l'oeuvre aussi bien dans les camps de type Guantanamo, dans les enlèvements de suspects par les services de renseignement et leur remise à d'autres services qui s'autorisent la torture, que dans les formes plus bénignes a priori pour l'individu, mais plus généralisées, de centres de détention pour étrangers aux frontières ou en amont de celles-ci ou encore, de manière moins visible, par des politiques préemptives d'interdiction de visa empêchant les personnes de se déplacer là où elles désiraient se rendre. L'hétérogénéité de ces dispositifs et de leurs effets sur les individus empêche d'y voir, à notre avis, une seule logique implacable, celle d'une modernité technocratique transformant les individus en individus réduits à leur bios, et leur niant leurs formes de vie institutionnelles. Les résistances sont diverses, multiples et les projets des programmes d'exception n'ont pas la même teneur selon qu'il s'agit d'emprisonner indéfiniment ou de renvoyer le plus vite possible un indésirable. Mais, on le verra, le débat est ouvert entre les auteurs qui, comme Agamben, y voient une tendance lourde des sociétés contemporaines, dépassant de loin les effets du 11 septembre, mais reconnaissant son impact accélérateur, et ceux qui insistent sur les spécificités de chaque dispositif et les normes et valeurs libérales qui contraignent les gouvernements qui s'en réclament et qui ont dans leur société des contre-pouvoirs effectifs, ainsi qu'une tradition enracinée de libertés publiques.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Ulrich Beck
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: L'Europe ne peut devenir un Etat ni une nation, et elle ne le fera pas. Elle ne peut donc être pensée en termes d'Etat-nation. Le chemin vers l'unification de l'Europe ne passe pas par l'uniformisation, mais plutôt par la reconnaissance de ses particularités nationales. La diversité est la source même du potentiel de créativité de l'Europe, le paradoxe étant que la pensée nationaliste peut être le pire ennemi de la nation. L'Union européenne est plus à même de faire avancer les intérêts nationaux que ne le feraient les nations en agissant seules.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Paolo Cuttitta
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Comment les frontières du pouvoir territorial – c'est-à-dire les frontières des Etats et d'autres entités politiques territoriales, comme l'espace Schengen et l'Union européenne – opèrent et se manifestent-elles dans le champ de la gestion de l'immigration ? Telles sont les questions auxquelles nous tenterons de répondre dans cet article.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Michel Peraldi
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Sous le terme général d'« économies criminelles », on rassemble usuellementdes activités qui visent la production, la circulation, la commercialisation deproduits interdits d'un point de vue moral ou légal, des activités dont l'organisation et l'effectuation incorporent une part de violence physique réellementexercée ou potentiellement présente dans l'organisation même du cycle productif, et enfin des activités menées par des individus, des groupes marginaux oudéviants, dans des conditions de totale ou de relative clandestinité. En Italie, oùles recherches sur ce thème ont certainement la plus grande ampleur historique,théorique et empirique, les chercheurs ont complété cette définition en spécifiant que ces économies criminelles sont le fait de groupes organisés et hiérarchisés, fondés sur des codes et des rituels d'appartenance (mafia, camorra, n'dranghetta, etc.). Vaille que vaille donc, et surtout à la lumière des travaux italiens ouanglo-saxons pionniers en la matière, il semblait établi que les économies criminelles concernaient des comportements économiques aberrants, parasites, archaï-ques, caractéristiques de groupes, d'individus ou de territoires marginalisés, lorsque les défections ou les faiblesses de l'Etat rendaient possible le développementd'une « autorité politique extralégale ». R. Sciarrone précise ainsi que même si cesgroupes ont pu s'emparer de domaines économiques et développer leurs affaires jusqu'à l'échelle mondiale, ils ne changent rien à la force et la nécessité de leurancrage territorial. Ajoutons enfin une dimension méthodologique essentielle :l'identification de ces acteurs sociaux, individuels ou collectifs passe d'abord parun signalement judiciaire ou policier. C'est en effet d'abord parce que leurs activités tombent sous le coup de la loi et que cellesci font l'objet de poursuites, queles groupes ou les individus sont « observables » dans des conditions où les chercheurs sont quasi exclusivement tributaires des données policières ou judiciaires.En poussant le raisonnement, on peut alors se demander si le caractère spécifiquede leurs activités n'est pas purement déduit, par nature en quelque sorte, ducaractère délictueux ou criminel de leurs pratiques. En somme, s'il n'y avait nimeurtres ni violence, pourrait-on parler d'économies criminelles comme d'unregistre identifiable, observable de faits économiques ? Parallèlement au débatitalien sur la nature économique, institutionnelle et sociale des organisationsmafieuses, ravivant la question de la nature « moderne » et capitaliste des entrepreneurs criminels, on assiste aujourd'hui à un double phénomène qui rendnécessaire un retour d'analyse sur l'évolution des phénomènes économiques ditcriminels vers la globalisation. D'une part, les organisations criminelles investissent tôt ou tard les économies « légales », et la question se pose alors de l'efficience économique directe des comportements et méthodes mafieux, qui ne peuvent plus alors être ramenés à des mécanismes aberrants ou parasites puisqu'ilssont alors au cour de l'économie. L'apparition de phénomènes criminels dans lesanciens pays du bloc socialiste notamment et surtout le moment de leur apparition, comme immédiate recomposition d'acteurs issus directement des mondesdirigeants de l'ancien régime, pose à notre sens de manière radicalement nouvelle la question des relations entre les acteurs, logiques et dispositifs de l'économie criminelle et ceux des économies « vertueuses ».
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Jérôme Valluy
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Annoncée à la télévision le 8 mars 2007 par le candidat Nicolas Sarkozy, la création du ministère de l'Immigration, de l'Intégration, de l'Identité nationale et du Codéveloppement a d'abord été en France une promesse électorale, un sujet de campagne et aurait pu connaître le sort d'autres idées de ce genre : être oubliée ou reformulée une fois le candidat arrivé au pouvoir. On pouvait alors se demander s'il ne s'agissait que d'un simple gadget de campagne, destiné à ratisser les voix de l'extrême droite, ou d'un axe idéologique et stratégique de recomposition de la droite autour de son nouveau leader . Le 18 mai 2007, l'annonce de la composition du gouvernement apporte des éléments de réponse : non seulement le nouveau ministère est bien là, mais en bonne position dans l'organigramme, confié de surcroît au plus fidèle collaborateur du nouveau président, avec un intitulé « à rallonge » qui laisse augurer d'un champ de compétence extensible, logé rue de Grenelle à proximité des Affaires sociales et du ministère de l'Education. On pouvait alors se demander encore si ce nouveau ministère serait éphémère, comme d'autres dans le passé (« temps libre », « économie solidaire », etc.), ou durable comme certains ministères récents (« culture », « environnement », etc.).
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Olivier Le Cour Grandmaison
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Annoncée à la télévision le 8 mars 2007 par le candidat Nicolas Sarkozy, la création mmigrés, « clandestins », « flux migratoires » et menaces diverses supposées peser sur la France en raison de la présence de « trop nombreux étrangers » que l'on dit mal intégrés à la société : vieille est cette antienne. En mai 2007, c'est elle qui a justifié la création, sans précédent connu, d'un ministère ad hoc doté de compétences multiples qui vont de la « gestion » de l'immigration à la défense de l'identité nationale en passant par l'intégration et le co-développement. Vaste programme. Pour l'heure, cette nouvelle administration et celui qui en a la charge se font surtout connaître par une activité menée avec un acharnement que rien ne vient tempérer : les expulsions massives d'étrangers en situation irrégulière pratiquées dans la continuité des orientations mises en ouvre par l'ancien ministre de l'Intérieur devenu président de la République. Comme le prouvent certains documents présents sur le site officiel du ministère que dirige Brice Hortefeux, une telle politique permet, conformément à la « culture du résultat » aujourd'hui de saison, de faire croire aux Français qu'en ces matières, le chef de l'Etat et le gouvernement font ce qu'ils disent et disent ce qu'ils font. Nouveauté ? Rupture, comme l'affirme le credo présidentiel relayé par de nombreux experts en communication ? A rebours de ce bruit médiatique savamment orchestré, on s'interro gera sur les origines républicaines, et la permanence d'un racisme et d'une xénophobie d'Etat que l'on découvre déjà présents dans les années 1920. Quels ont été leurs ressorts anthropologiques, ethnologiques et politiques ? Dans quelles circonstances ont-ils surgi ? Quelles furent alors, pour les populations coloniales visées, les conséquences juridiques des dispositions adoptées ? Telles sont quelques-unes des questions auxquelles nous chercherons à répondre.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Jérôme Valluy
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: L'Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides (OFPRA), qui accordait en 1973 le statut de réfugié à 85 % des exilés demandant l'asile, en 1990, le refuse à 85 % d'entre eux, au terme d'un retournement progressif mais rapide, en moins de vingt ans . L'élévation tendancielle des taux de rejets des demandes d'asile s'amorce dès le début des années 1970 (voir le graphique n°1) et se prolonge jusqu'à aujourd'hui où l'OFPRA rejette près de 95 % des demandes d'asile, la Commission des recours des réfugiés (CRR), juridiction d'appel contre les décisions de l'OFPRA, ramenant ce taux de rejet à 85 % environ. Durant ces quarante ans, le nombre total d'étrangers entrant annuellement en France, sous des titres de séjours divers, n'a pourtant jamais cessé de diminuer passant de 390 000 en 1970 à 192 000 en 1981 et 54 000 en 2004 , ou, pour l'exprimer autrement, à plus de 200 000 par an en moyenne durant les années 1960 à moins de 100 000 par an dans cette dernière décennie et la proportion d'immigrés par rapport à la population totale est demeurée stable de l'ordre de 7,5%.
  • Political Geography: Europe
140. Fragmenta
  • Author: Laurence Corbel, Ilias Poulos
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Alors que la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale marque, pour la plupart des pays occidentaux, le début d'une ère de paix, de prospérité et d'espoir pour l'avenir, la Grèce a vu la guerre antifasciste se transformer en guerre civile entre la résistance de gauche et le gouvernement en place. A la fin de cette guerre, en 1949, des milliers de civils et de combattants ont dû quitter e pays par peur des représailles. La population civile a été éparpillée un peu partout en Europe de l'Est.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Gülçin Erdi Lelandais
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: La littérature sur la question de l'internationalisation des conflits mais aussi sur la transnationalisation des mouvements sociaux s'est considérablement développée depuis les années 1990. Toutefois, la plupart des recherches effectuées en la matière sont centrées sur l'altermondialisme dans des pays développés - notamment les Etats-Unis, les pays d'Europe du Nord, et en partie ceux d'Amérique latine–et néglige l'émergence et le développement de ce phénomène dans d'autres régions du monde, le Sud de la Méditerranée entre autres. Nous constatons également que les études sur l'altermondialisme ne se sont pas vraiment penchées sur les significations de ce phénomène dans cette aire géographique. Nous disposons de peu d'éléments sur l'implication des pays de cette région dans l'altermondialisme, ou sur son intensité et son apport. De nombreux ouvrages publiés en France tentent certaines généralisations sur ces mouvements à partir du seul exemple des altermondialismes en Europe. Ce type d'approches entraîne le risque d'amener trop rapidement à des conclusions non nécessairement vérifiées par des analyses de l'autre côté de la Méditerranée. Par ailleurs, ce problème peut être accentué par l'absence de visibilité des organisations sur les zones géographiques précédemment citées. L'intérêt médiatique, mais aussi universitaire, est ainsi souvent dirigé vers les mouvements occidentaux, et lorsqu'une activité contestataire relativement importante apparaît dans un pays extra-européen de la Méditerranée, elle ne paraît pas susciter le même degré d'intérêt que ses homologues étrangers.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Gülçin Erdi Lelandais
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: « Notre rôle, c'est de casser dans la tête des individus l'idée que tout est comme ça et que rien ne pourrait changer. Il faut arriver à convaincre les gens que si on se réunit, si on résiste, tout est possible. C'était le cas du 1er mars. Tout le monde a cru que le Parlement voterait naturellement pour la participation à la guerre en Irak, mais toutes les organisations de la société civile, ensemble, ont organisé une mobilisation tellement forte que ça a cassé l'image dans l'esprit des gens que la mobilisation sociale ne peut jamais affecter les politiques gouvernementales. »
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Eric Cheynis
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: L'approche sociologique de la participation au Forum social mondial implique de tenir compte de plusieurs aspects des conditions de cette pratique. Il s'agit tout d'abord de la resituer dans un espace international de l'altermondialisme et de l'analyser comme imbriquée dans des rapports de forces entre pays. Les types de contraintes (politiques, économiques, linguistiques) qui pèsent sur elle, tout comme la pluralité des offres d'engagement et les multiples usages et appropriations que recouvre le terme « altermondialisme », doivent également être examinés. Par ailleurs, la diversité des modes d'investissement dans cet espace ne se comprend que rapportée aux processus d'accumulation différenciée de capital international et aux rôles joués par les acteurs et institutions qui en sont les intermédiaires.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Julian Jeandesboz
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: La récente publication d'une « petite conférence sur la frontière », initialement prononcée le 18 novembre 2006 au Centre dramatique national de Montreuil, constitue un excellent prétexte pour revenir sur les réflexions menées par Etienne Balibar depuis plus de dix ans sur l'Europe, ses frontières et ses citoyens. La parution de cette « petite conférence », donnée devant un public majoritairement constitué de jeunes auditeurs, illustre à elle seule certaines des préoccupations de l'auteur quant au rôle général du travail (des) intellectuel(s) et quant au traitement d'une question qui, loin de n'être qu'un thème à laisser aux experts et aux militants, concerne également les sociétés et les citoyens européens dans leur ensemble. Son titre, Très loin et tout près, résume de manière simple l'une des préoccupations de la réflexion proposée par Balibar sur l'Europe, à savoir la nécessité de problématiser la constitution (à tous les sens du terme) d'un espace de gouvernement européen et les limites qui lui sont données sur le plan interne comme sur le plan externe par les acteurs dominants des processus d'européanisation communautaires, sous un angle politique qui serait celui d'un « droit de cité » conjoint aux ressortissants communautaires et extra-communautaires.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Mathile Darley
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Les postes frontières sont sans doute la manifestation la plus évidente de l'implantation dans l'espace d'un élément de discontinuité (le poste et son aménagement architectural) explicitement affecté au contrôle des individus souhaitant entrer sur le territoire national ou en sortir. Souvent premiers points de contact du voyageur avec l'Etat sur le territoire duquel il pénètre et, à ce titre, premiers représentants de l'Etat-nation, les gardes-frontières incarnent l'ordre étatique légitime. A travers la matérialisation architecturale du poste frontière, l'Etat donne à voir le contrôle qu'il entend exercer sur son territoire par le filtrage des voyageurs cherchant à y pénétrer (ou à en sortir). De ce fait, les frontières ont souvent été présentées, notamment dans les nombreux travaux de recherche développés sur ce thème depuis le début des années 1990, comme le lieu privilégié d'investigation et d'interprétation des aspects symboliques de l'Etat, puisque s'y exerce « l'autorité souveraine de l'Etat d'exclure ». A cela s'ajoute le rôle croissant qu'on leur reconnaît géné ralement dans le dispositif politique, dans un contexte d'évolution supposée des risques sécuritaires vers des formes de plus en plus transfrontalières et non plus « stato-centrées ».
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Sarah S. Willen
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Depuis le début de l'année 2007, près de 10 000 hommes, femmes et enfants venant d'Afrique–pour la plupart du Darfour, du Sud6Soudan et de l'Erythrée–ont traversé la longue frontière poreuse entre Egypte et Israël pour demander l'asile En Israël, cet afflux inattendu de demandeurs d'asile a généré beaucoup de controverses politiques, d'attention publique et d'activités militantes locales. D'un côté, la récente affluence de réfugiés est abordée et débattue du point de vue de l'autodéfinition démographique que s'est attribuée le pays en tant qu'Etat « juif et démocratique ». Elle est travaillée par un sentiment que l'on pourrait qualifier d'« inquiétude démographique » devant la probabilité d'un afflux imminent bien plus important de réfugiés en provenance de pays africains en crise. D'un autre côté, toutefois, ces discussions sont déterminées par le fait que certains de ces demandeurs d'asile ont vécu des horreurs faisant écho à la mémoire collective juive-israélienne de la Shoah ou de l'Holocauste : ceux qui ont fui ce que la communauté internationale décrit comme le génocide du Darfour. En d'autres termes, ces dispositions israéliennes en faveur d'un sous-groupe spécifique de réfugiés ne dépendent pas simplement du fait que ces individus ont fait l'expérience d'une souffrance et d'un exil, mais elles tiennent plutôt à une proximité entre la forme particulière de souffrance à laquelle ils ont été exposés et les souffrances subies par les juifs dans l'Europe nazie–proximité qu'un journaliste qualifie d'« affinité de génocide ».
  • Political Geography: Europe, Israel
  • Author: Christophe Wasinski
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: En tant qu'outil traditionnel du pouvoir, il est légitime que les forces armées fassent l'objet d'attention notamment de la part de représentants politiques, de journalistes, de membres d'organisations non gouvernementales et, bien entendu, de chercheurs. Cette attention porte très régulièrement sur le déroulement et les résultats des opérations. Ainsi, les victimes civiles et militaires des conflits provoquent ponctuellement des débats publics, plus ou moins importants relatifs aux engagements et aux moyens mis en oeuvre. C'est d'ailleurs le cas de nos jours, à propos de l'Irak, dans plusieurs Etats membres de la coalition attaquante. Il arrive également que des questions portant sur le matériel militaire déclenchent d'importantes réactions populaires. En guise d'exemple on se souviendra des impressionnantes manifestions qui avaient suivi la décision de déployer des missiles nucléaires américains en Europe occidentale (les « euromissiles ») au début des années 1980. Enfin, la légitimité des doctrines militaires sous-jacentes aux actions des forces armées peut être mise en question. Cela a par exemple été régulièrement le cas par des chercheurs de sciences politiques spécialisés dans le domaine des relations internationals. Bien qu'elle provoque rarement le déplacement de foules contesta- trices cette dernière forme d'investigation est essentielle dans la mesure où elle interroge l'essence même des pratiques militaires. La doctrine militaire codifiant la raison d'être de l'institution, son analyse paraît incontournable (au même titre qu'il parait incontournable que la société puisse enquêter et légiférer, par exemple sur les techniques de production des biens alimentaires).
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Antonia Garcia Castro, Tomas Ruiz-Rivas
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: « Cependant, cela ne fait pas de doute que la société a besoin de constructions symboliques, et plus encore quand elle affronte des faits si difficiles à assumer par la raison. Et c'est de cela dont nous allons parler aujourd'hui, demain et après-demain. Du rôle que joue ou peut jouer l'art dans un débat plus large sur les disparus, de la possibilité de la représentation de l'horreur, des limites de cette représentation et de sa transcendance, ou de sa non-transcendance, politique, et aussi de la question de savoir si les arts du visuel peuvent construire des "lieux". Si elles peuvent jouer un rôle dans la restitution du disparu au temps historique duquel il a été arraché ».
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Cedric Audebert, Nelly Robin
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Au début de l'année 2006, l'opinion internationale s'est émue du naufrage, aux frontières de l'Europe, de milliers d'émigrants clandestins subsahariens, dont le destin tragique rappelle celui des boat people antillais ayant tenté de rejoindre les Etats-Unis au cours des trois dernières décennies. Quoique la dimension politique ait joué un rôle majeur dans la genèse des premiers flux massifs de boat people haïtiens et cubains dans les années 1960, les migrations maritimes subsahariennes et caribéennes répondent à des déterminants similaires. Elles expriment l'acuité de la crise économique sévissant dans les pays d'origine et correspondent à une demande sociale, dans un contexte où la migration de l'individu est perçue comme un préalable nécessaire à l'ascension sociale du collectif familial.
  • Political Geography: United States, America, Europe
  • Author: Alessandro Dal Lago
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Ils ont quitté l'Afrique la veille de Noël pour partir à la recherche d'une vie meilleure en Europe. Au lieu de cela, le bateau à bord duquel ils se trouvaient a conduit les migrants à la mort, allant à la dérive sur 2000 miles à travers l'Océan Atlantique jusqu'à l'île Barbade dans les Caraïbes.
  • Political Geography: Europe, Atlantic Ocean
  • Author: Stephan Davidshofer, Dick Marty
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Cet entretien a été réalisé avec Dick Marty qui a maintes fois été activement confronté – au long de sa carrière de Parlementaire mais également de magistrat – à la défense de l'Etat de droit et des libertés civiles. Cet entretien porte notamment sur les suites de son action en tant que rapporteur pour le compte du Conseil de l'Europe sur l'affaire dite des prisons secrètes de la CIA en Europe dans le cadre de la « guerre contre le terrorisme » depuis les attentats du 11 septembre 2001 2, ainsi que sur son « actualité » visant à replacer la défense de l'Etat de droit au centre des enjeux de la lutte contre le terrorisme.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Gülçin Erdi Lelandais
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: L'exode rural qui se développe fortement en Turquie à partir des années 1950 a entraîné à la périphérie d'Istanbul l'apparition de gecekondu (bidonvilles) , puis leur multiplication en raison à la fois de l'absence de politiques publiques d'aménagement urbain d'une part, et des calculs électoraux des responsables politiques de l'autre. L'ouverture des négociations avec l'Union européenne en 2006 et le choix d'Istanbul comme capitale culturelle de l'Europe pour l'année 2010 ont été l'occasion pour la Turquie de mettre sur pied un vaste projet de transformation urbaine dont un des aspects est la destruction des bidonvilles pour les remplacer rapidement par des cités d'immeubles construites par Toplu Konut Idaresi (TOKI), institution publique de construction de logements collectifs. Contrairement aux années 1980 et 1990 où ce type de construction était localisé dans les quartiers périphériques il s'agit maintenant, au coeur des villes, de restructurer des zones considérées comme insalubres, mais à fort potentiel immobilier, pour y installer des populations socialement et financièrement aisées.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Joseph Soeters, Delphine Resteigne
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: La coopération multinationale dans le registre militaire n'est pas quelque chose de tout à fait nouveau. Même si l'on en parle davantage depuis ces dernières années, déjà pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les forces alliées opéraient côte à côte contre l'ennemi. Ainsi, la libération du continent européen fut le résultat de l'effort collectif des troupes issues de différents pays. Et si chacune agissait de manière relativement isolée et visait des objectifs propres, toutes ces actions étaient cependant coordonnées dans le cadre d'une seule et même mission menée sur le vieux continent. Tout au long de l'histoire, nous pouvons relever d'autres exemples d'actions militaires multinationales que ce soit en Europe ou ailleurs comme, par exemple, le soutien apporté aux otages occidentaux pendant la révolte des Boxers à Pékin il y a plus d'une centaine d'années. Dans cette action courte mais décisive, le corps expéditionnaire (Etats-Unis, Grande-Bretagne, France, Italie, Allemagne et Empire austro hongrois), allié aux unités russes et japonaises, réussit rapidement à s'assurer la victoire et ce, malgré certaines tensions durant la marche vers Pékin. Toutefois, par rapport à ces précédentes collaborations, les coalitions militaires actuelles sont devenues incontournables et ne constituent plus, comme autrefois, des cas de figure isolés. Depuis la fin de la guerre froide, quatre facteurs ont encouragé cette coopération croissante entre les armées nationales. Premièrement, cette collaboration accrue est liée à la professionnalisation des forces armées car, avec la fin de la conscription observée dans un nombre croissant de pays, toute une série de changements structurels et institutionnels ont été entrepris pour réduire les effectifs de forces. Dans certains pays, comme en Belgique, cette diminution a été renforcée par les effets négatifs d'une pyramide des âges déséquilibrée et par un manque de jeunes recrues pouvant être déployées en opérations. Deuxièmement, avec la fin de la menace soviétique (et plus récemment les effets de la crise financière sur les budgets nationaux), nous avons assisté à une diminution importante des montants consacrés aux dépenses militaires. Aussi, les différentes armées ont été de plus en plus enclines à unir leurs efforts pour éviter toute duplication inutile de moyens. Troisièmement, en raison de menaces plus diffuses, les tâches opérationnelles nécessitent que les effectifs soient maintenus pour des durées d'intervention plus longues. La nature des missions ayant gagné en complexité, les militaires doivent à la fois faire preuve de flexibilité tout en étant spécialistes, ce qui complique d'ailleurs la détermination a priori de scénarios d'engagement. Enfin, cette collaboration internationale est également facilitée par les progrès technologiques observés dans le domaine des nouvelles technologies de l'information et de la communication (NTIC) qui améliorent l'échange d'informations et la coordination entre les différents intervenants. Dès lors, comme c'est le cas dans le domaine des affaires et du commerce international, la coopération militaire multinationale n'est plus confinée à quelques rares missions et, à un niveau plus macro-structurel, elle est même devenue indispensable. Dans une Europe composée d'une myriade de petits pays, nous avons ainsi progressivement assisté à une augmentation et à une institutionnalisation des composantes militaires multinationales comme l'Eurocorps, les Corps germano-néerlandais, germano-français ou encore nord-est. A cela, se sont récemment ajoutés, depuis début 2007, les groupements tactiques européens qui servent à la fois d'instrument opérationnel de gestion de crises et d'outil de transformation militaire européenne. Du côté de l'OTAN également, tant du côté du volet opérations que de la transformation, nous retrouvons également des configurations organisationnelles multinationales. Pour les « petits » pays, ces collaborations présentent certains avantages et permet tent ainsi de prendre part simultanément à différentes missions sans pour autant prendre en charge la totalité des coûts liés à un déploiement opérationnel. Ce partage des coûts et des risques permet ainsi de déployer des capacités dans des domaines d'action liés à des niches de compétences spécifiques. Mais, à l'heure actuelle, aussi pour s'assurer une certaine légitimité, cette collaboration multinationale est également soutenue par les plus grands pays, comme l'illustrent les récentes coalitions engagées en Irak ou en Afghanistan. Nous avons aussi assisté à un phénomène de centralisation opérationnelle au sein d'états-majors interarmés mais nous remarquons, et c'est ce qui fait l'objet du présent article, que cette multinationalisation ne s'observe plus uniquement au niveau des fonctions d'états-majors mais commence à descendre vers les plus bas échelons de la hiérarchie, pour certaines fonctions spécialisées ou lors des temps libres tout du moins. Ainsi, lorsqu'ils sont déployés dans des théâtres d'opérations, les militaires partagent les mêmes camps avec d'autres militaires étrangers avec lesquels ils seront parfois aussi amenés à travailler, même si certains obstacles continuent à ralentir ce processus descendant de multinationalisation. En outre, depuis quelques années, la composition plus diverse des forces d'intervention a été renforcée par une plus grande diversité interne liée à l'ouverture des forces armées à de nouvelles catégories de personnel. En opérations, cette complexité organisationnelle se voit en outre renforcée par deux autres facteurs de diversité à savoir le caractère interforces, liées à la présence de différentes spécialités et composantes et le caractère interagences de par la collaboration avec les intervenants civils. Dans les lignes qui suivent, nous ne nous pencherons pas sur ce dernier point, mais nous nous limiterons plutôt à la coopération militaire multinationale. Avec, en toile de fond, ce contexte de plus grande diversité – interne et externe –, l'objectif visé dans le présent article est, d'une part, de revenir sur la notion même de culture pour avancer une approche pragmatique et différenciée de culture militaire. Ensuite, dans une perspective plus empirique, il s'agit d'analyser les stratégies de coopération relevées dans plusieurs études de cas menées in situ ainsi que les obstacles majeurs qui continuent d'entraver une intégration accrue.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Xavier Crettiez
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Alors que l'actualité ne cesse d'égrener son lot d'arrestations de militants nationalistes basques et que chaque prise policière est l'occasion d'annoncer la mauvaise santé de l'organisation ETA en même temps que de poser un regard enthousiaste sur l'efficacité de la coopération franco-espagnole, paraissent deux ouvrages de bonne facture sur la violence au Pays Basque.
  • Political Geography: Europe, Paris
  • Author: Jean-Baptiste Harguindeguy, Romain Pasquier
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Les études sur le multiculturalisme et les politiques linguistiques – encore peu diffusées en France – ont connu un grand essor dans l'ensemble de l'Europe depuis les années 1980. C'est dans le but de combler cette lacune que nous avons pris l'initiative d'organiser une session thématique consacrée aux mobilisations ethnolinguistiques en Europe lors du 10e Congrès de l'Association Française de Science Politique à Grenoble en septembre 2009. Ce numéro de la revue Cultures Conflits vise à prolonger cet effort en se centrant sur les mobilisations de défense et de promotion des langues régionales en Europe.
  • Political Geography: Europe, France
  • Author: Rada Ivekovic
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Nos catégories sociologiques ont une histoire. Elles sont souvent normatives et stigmatisantes. Après les évictions brutales d'Italie depuis plusieurs années, depuis les traitements douteux qui leur sont administrés en Slovaquie ou en Roumanie en guise de remède, depuis leur déportation de France à l'été 2010, nous n'entendons plus beaucoup parler des Roms. Certes, il y a eu des protestations et des pétitions. Les Roms ne suscitent aucun intérêt public à plus grande échelle pour les mêmes raisons qui font qu'ils sont ainsi traités. Il y a des réactions scandalisées ou « alibis » sur le moment, mais personne ne pense sérieusement à résoudre ce problème européen, car il est constitutif de nos sociétés. Il faudra qu'ils se mobilisent par eux-mêmes. Or, ils sont dispersés, et leurs associations sont « culturalisées », « misérabilisées » et dépolitisées. Ils sont bien au-delà des « lignes abyssales » comme dirait Boaventura de Sousa Santos .
  • Political Geography: Europe, Rome
  • Author: Nando Sigona
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Lors d'une récente communication au Parlement et au Conseil européen, la Commission européenne (2011) est revenue sur la question des Roms, suite aux événements relatifs aux expulsions de Roms roumains par la France l'été dernier. Cette intervention était très attendue car la Commission avait jusque là évité de prendre position sur ce sujet, laissant l'initiative aux États membres . Cette réticence était d'autant plus marquée lorsque les Roms résidaient dans les États membres les plus riches. Dans cette communication qui pose les lignes directrices d'une intervention de coordination européenne pour les stratégies nationales d'intégration des Roms, la Commission explique que les 10 à` 12 millions de Roms qui vivent en Europe, et dont la moitié réside au sein de l'Union Européenne (UE), sont victimes de « préjugés, d'intolérance, de discriminations et d'exclusion sociale » et que ces facteurs conditionnent de nomb...
  • Political Geography: Europe, Rome
  • Author: Mark B. Salter
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Aux yeux du Conseil de l'Europe et de l'Union européenne, de même que pour plusieurs États européens, le groupe connu sous le nom de « Roms » pose un problème de nature politique : ce groupe remet en question les conceptions d'identité nationale, de lieu, d'appartenance, de territoire, de citoyenneté et de droits. Il est difficile de définir de façon empirique la « communauté » rom, que ce soit relativement à la taille de sa population (entre huit et douze millions), à sa localisation (partout en Europe), à ses caractéristiques ethniques, ou encore à l'existence d'une culture ou d'une langue commune (par exemple, si plusieurs dialectes Roms sont mutuellement compréhensibles, d'autres ne le sont pas). Cependant, d'un pays à l'autre, les différentes communautés identifiées en tant que Roms souffrent manifestement de discriminations ethniques et raciales ? de difficultés aux chapitres de l'intégration, de la mobilité et de l'assimilation ? en plus d'être souvent victimes d'attaques vio...
  • Political Geography: Europe, Canada, Rome
  • Author: Judit Tóth
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: Le projet visant à établir un État de droit après la rupture de 1989 n'a pas eu pour conséquence un progrès politique, économique ou social pour les Roms dans les pays d'Europe centrale et orientale – mis à part, peut être, la liberté d'exprimer leurs griefs. Le fort taux de chômage au sein de la communauté rom (dissimulé durant la période communiste), une discrimination désormais plus ouverte (que la politique officielle égalitariste était parvenue à minimiser), la ségrégation dans des ghettos et des écoles spéciales, la violence ethnique et la brutalité de la police sont dès lors apparus comme des « nouveautés ». Ce sont pourtant des faits bien connus et traités par nombre d'agences et d'organismes, dont l'Union européenne, le Parlement européen, le Conseil de l'Europe, la Commission européenne contre le racisme et l'intolérance (ECRI), l'Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe (OSCE), le Haut-commissariat pour les minorités nationales, l'Agence des droits fondam...
  • Political Geography: Europe, Rome
  • Author: Alejandro Eggenschwiler, Anaïs Faure Atger
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: En 1999, le Traité d'Amsterdam a établi les fondations de l'Espace européen de liberté, de sécurité et de justice (ELSJ). Celuici prévoit l'harmonisation des lois dans les domaines de l'immigration, de l'asile, du contrôle des frontières et des visas, à l'appui du principe de la libre circulation des personnes. Le programme de Stockholm, adopté en décembre 2009, définit les orientations stratégiques des politiques européennes correspondantes pour les cinq prochaines années. Il entend placer les citoyens au coeur des politiques dans ce domaine. Ces engagements européens en faveur de la protection des droits de l'individu ont d'ailleurs été réaffirmés par l'intégration de la Charte des droits fondamentaux dans le droit de l'Union suite à l'adoption du Traité de Lisbonne. Toutefois, ces velléités d'intégration européenne autour de principes communs, tels que l'interdiction de toute forme de discrimination et de respect des droits fondamentaux, se heurtent à la résistance des États memb...
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Elspeth Guild
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: L'expulsion de Roms bulgares et roumains d'Italie en 2009 et de France en 2010 a provoqué de nombreuses discussions, contestations et préoccupations. En ce qui concerne la France, les expulsions de Roms de juillet et août 2010 (des expulsions seraient encore en cours selon de nombreuses sources) ont eu de multiples conséquences : elles ont généré de la discorde au sein des institutions de l'Union Européenne ; elles ont amené le commissaire européen chargé des droits des citoyens à s'opposer au président français ; elles ont enfin provoqué de l'indignation au-delà de l'Union Européenne (UE). Curieusement, la question de l'effectivité et de l'efficacité de la politique d'expulsion n'a pas fait l'objet d'une attention particulière dans le débat politique. Pour combler cette lacune, il importe de dire un mot des objectifs de cette politique. Dans l'UE, l'expulsion d'individus est généralement entreprise afin de mettre un terme à la présence illégale d'individus sur le territoire d'un Ét...
  • Political Geography: Europe, France, Rome
  • Author: Didier Bigo
  • Publication Date: 05-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures & Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures & Conflits
  • Abstract: On aurait pu penser que les pratiques du gouvernement français à l'égard des Roms vivant en France allaient donner lieu à une série d'articles et de publications spécialisées qui discuteraient les fondements de ces logiques de suspicion, de détention, de circulation forcée, d'exclusion, et que seraient approfondies les raisons pour lesquelles les Roms sont pris à partie, bien plus que d'autres groupes sociaux.
  • Political Geography: Europe, France
  • Author: Kathleen M. Vogel
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Security
  • Institution: Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University
  • Abstract: In September 2011, scientists in the Netherlands announced new experimental findings that would not only threaten the conduct and publication of influenza research, but would have significant policy and intelligence implications. Ron Fouchier, an influenza virologist at the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, declared at the Fourth European Scientific Working Group on Influenza in Malta that his research group had created a modified variant of the H5N1 avian influenza virus (hereafter the H5N1 virus) that was transmissible via aerosol between ferrets. Until that point, the H5N1 virus, which can be lethal to humans, was known to be transmissible only through direct, physical contact with infected animals.
  • Political Geography: Europe, Netherlands
  • Author: Burak Kadercan
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Security
  • Institution: Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University
  • Abstract: Why are some states more willing to adopt military innovations than others? Why, for example, were the great powers of Europe able to successfully reform their military practices to better adapt to and participate in the so-called military revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries while their most important extra- European competitor, the Ottoman Empire, failed to do so? The conventional wisdom suggests that cultural factors, including religious beliefs and a misplaced sense of superiority, blinded Ottoman rulers to the utility of innovations stemming from this military revolution, which involved radical changes in military strategy and tactics. The implication is that these rulers were almost suicidal, resisting military reforms until the early nineteenth century despite suffering continuous defeats for more than two hundred years. Such thinking follows not from a close reading of the historical and sociological literature on the Ottoman Empire, but from an Orientalist view of non-Western political organizations that plagues not only international relations theory but also military history.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Todd H. Hall, Jia Ian Chong
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Security
  • Institution: Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University
  • Abstract: A century has passed since the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo set in motion a chain of events that would eventually convulse Europe in war. Possibly no conflict has been the focus of more scholarly attention. The questions of how and why European states came to abandon peaceful coexistence for four years of armed hostilities—ending tens of millions of lives and several imperial dynasties—have captivated historians and international relations scholars alike.
  • Topic: International Relations, Security, War
  • Political Geography: United States, Europe, Middle East, East Asia
  • Author: Jack Snyder
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Security
  • Institution: Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University
  • Abstract: One reason why Europe went to war in 1914 is that all of the continental great powers judged it a favorable moment for a fight, and all were pessimistic about postponing the fight until later. On its face, this explanation constitutes a paradox. Still, each power had a superficially plausible reason for thinking this was true.
  • Topic: International Relations, Security, War
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Gerogi Tzvetkov
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Connections
  • Institution: Partnership for Peace Consortium of Defense Academies and Security Studies Institutes
  • Abstract: No abstract is available.
  • Topic: Cold War
  • Political Geography: Europe, Bulgaria
  • Author: Paul Kubicek
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: This brief commentary assesses the progress made by Turkey under the Justice and Development Party (the AK Party) toward European Union (EU) membership and democratization. While it acknowledges positive steps, it notes that the goals of EU accession and democratic consolidation remain elusive. One consideration is that the expectations or “goalposts” for both have moved so that, relative to the objectives of those supporting democratic freedoms and Europeanization, progress in Turkey has still been rather modest. While the democratization package of September 2013 offers some hope for democratization, it remains difficult to see substantial progress in terms of joining the EU.
  • Topic: Development
  • Political Geography: Europe, Turkey
  • Author: Raymond Taras
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: Do perceptions of Muslim communities differ among receiving European societies? Are attitudes towards Euro-Turks more critical than other groups? Do Euro-Turks feel marginalized and recognize social distance from the majority? This paper presents data from cross-national research projects to assess the social distance between national majority and Muslim minorities, in particular Euro-Turks. It also considers the extent to which religion, ethnicity, and culture help shape Islamophobia and anti-Turkish attitudes. Social distance is not treated as a proxy variable for discrimination or exclusion, but it serves as an indicator of the possible marginalization of Euro-Turks. Further, increasing social distance between majority and minority Muslim groups may also serve as a reliable indicator of a Europe in crisis, confronting its multiple conflicting identities.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Ali Murat Yel
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: THE NAQSHBANDIYYA is perhaps one of the widest-spread Islamic religious brotherhoods due to its active involvement in political affairs. Its 'strength' comes from the fact it could trace the sheiks of the order as far back as to the Prophet of Islam through his companion Abu Bakr. The silsila (the chain of transmission) of the order also contains some very important figures in Islamic history, like Salman al-Farisi and Bayazid al-Bistami. Despite the importance of the order and its worldwide expansion, the published works on the subject could fill only a small shelf. The order also has a great number of followers in Turkey, including some prominent political figures. Since Shah Bahauddin Naqshband, the founder of the order, the succeeding sheiks of the Naqshbandiyya tarikat (religious order) have currently been handed to Sheikh Nazim al-Kibrisi al-Haqqani, a Turkish Cypriot. The Sheikh has been given the task of expanding the order to the West, and as a result of arduous efforts he has been able to establish some centers in various European and American cities, with the biggest one being in London. Author Tayfun Atay studied this center for his Ph.D. thesis submitted to London University.
  • Topic: Islam
  • Political Geography: Britain, America, Europe, Turkey, London
  • Author: Harvey E. Goldberg
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: THE SUBTITLE of this one-volume overview of Jewish history presents its main focus as the notion of diaspora, but its twenty-eight chapters are more accurately grasped by dividing them into sub-themes. Chapters 1-9 discuss the development of “diaspora” as a social-historical concept in recent scholarship, and sketch the emergence of the Jewish diaspora from Biblical times (when Israelites and Judeans were exiled by the Assyrian and Babylonian empires), through the diaspora under Roman rule whose benchmark was the destruction of the (second) Jerusalem Temple in 70 of the Common Era. The next section (chapters 10-15) portrays medieval Jewish life, mainly within the context of Christian Europe. Chapters 16-18 are a history of ideas, touching upon major Enlightenment luminaries and some of the reactions of Romantic thinkers. It underlines the (often multivalent) ways that Jews appeared within these intellectual schemes. The emergence of racial ideas, feeding into Nazi ideology and policies, and a condensed history of the Holocaust are presented in chapters 19-27. A final chapter discusses “Zionism, Israel, and the Palestinians,” tailing off in the 1970s.
  • Topic: Development
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Unal Eris
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: SHIVDEEP GREWAL has written this excellent research-turned-into-a book on Jurgen Habermas, one of the most important philosophers of our time. He makes a thorough analysis of Habermas' work and in the theoretical part of the book he discusses how modernity in both cultural and social terms has evolved in such a way that transcends the importance of nation state and finds a new meaning at the European Union level.
  • Topic: Globalization
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Azzam Tamimi
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: During the months leading up to July 3, 2013, the state of Egypt mirrored that of Chile 40 years ago. What Egypt's Mohamed Mursi and Chile's Salvador Allende shared was the misfortune of coming to power with a relatively large majority and an adamant refusal to surrender. While there is no evidence of U.S. involvement in the process, America and its allies in the European Union have refrained from calling what happened in Egypt a coup. Egypt – much like Chile – will likely return to the path of democracy, though after considerable time and effort, and a projected roadmap that will likely generate further economic hardship and instability.
  • Topic: Economics
  • Political Geography: Europe, Egypt, Chile
  • Author: Hakki Tas
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: The Gladio Scandal in Europe and, more recently, Turkey's Ergenekon trials highlight the importance of hidden power networks behind the façade of parliamentary democracy. Dubbed as “deep state” in the Turkish context, the phenomenon suffers from a scarcity of scholarly analyses. This paper demonstrates the lack of academic interest in this complex issue in Europe, and Turkey in particular. After reviewing the central currents in the academic literature on the Turkish deep state, it offers an analysis of the Ergenekon affair in continuity with Turkey's recent past.
  • Topic: Development, Government
  • Political Geography: Europe, Turkey
  • Author: Ates Altinordu
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: Multiple Modernities and Postsecular Societies Multiple Modernities and Postsecular Societies brings together the two recently much discussed concepts in its title and explores them through a number of case studies. The introduction by Massimo Rosati and Kristina Stoeckl, the volume's editors, provides a useful recapitulation of these two ideas and draws attention to their potential links. The framework of multiple modernities, as developed by Shmuel Eisenstadt and further articulated by a number of his colleagues and students, contains many advantages over its intellectual alternatives. While it allows the comparative analysis of the modern features of different world societies, it has a much less rigid structure than classical modernization theory. The latter assumed that all societies would follow more or less the same (Western) trajectory of modernization and eventually converge in their cultural and institutional features. The multiple modernities model avoids the ideological underpinnings of its precursor by positing that each society selectively appropriates and interprets the cultural program and institutional patterns of modernity in line with its preexisting cultural characteristics. Thus, societal patterns that diverge from their Western counterparts are not automatically labeled non-modern. Finally, the decoupling of modernity from Westernization and the attribution of reflectivity and creativity to non-Western cultures provides an important alternative against simplistic versions of civilizational analysis in the Huntingtonian mold.
  • Topic: Development
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Sreemati Ganguli
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: Dynamics of Energy Governance in Europe and Russia Relations between Europe and Russia in the post-Cold War era constitute a fascinating area of study, as it involves many interlinked socioeconomic and political issues. Significantly, the events that shaped the political landscape of contemporary Europe, i.e., the reunification of Germany and collapse of the Soviet domination of East Europe, were precursors to the disintegration of the Soviet Union. The book under discussion focuses on the issue of energy governance in Europe and Russia, which is significant as both Russia and Europe share a flourishing codependent energy trade relation and the issue touches on many areas of common bilateral concern- political, economic, technological, environmental, bureaucratic and legal. The book has twelve chapters, divided in three thematic sections, apart from Introduction, Conclusion and Afterword. It represents a culmination of debates exchanged through the Political Economy of Energy in Europe and Russia (PEEER) network and approaches the entire issue through the theoretical approach of International Political Economy. Essentially, the book aims to focus on multiple actors and institutions that shape the policy processes of energy governance in Europe and Russia, in the context of an interlinked and interdependent global, regional and local scenario. In the first section on “Transnational Dynamics” the focus is on legal issues. Tatiana Romanova discusses EU-Russian energy relations in the context of legal approximation (Article 55 of the EU-Russian Partnership and Cooperation Agreement), noting two particular focal points – the improvement of the energy trade scenario and the clean energy agenda. Daniel Behn and Vitally Pogoretskyy analyze the system of dual gas pricing in Russia and its impact on EU imports. They raise an important debate between the Statist and Liberal approaches by questioning the consistency of this system with WTO regulations. For Anatole Boute, the export of European foreign energy efficiency rules to non-EU countries, especially Russia, has the potential to become the cornerstone of the EU's new energy diplomacy, to meet the challenges of a secure energy supply from Russia, and to mitigate bilateral climate concerns. M. F. Keating, on the other hand, deals with the connection between and possible harmonization of global best practices (to systemically use competition, regulation and privatization to reform the energy sector) and the EU's energy security agenda.
  • Topic: Cold War, Governance
  • Political Geography: Russia, Europe, Germany
  • Author: Metin Atmaca
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: Picknick mit den Paschas: Aleppo und die levantinische Handelsfirma Fratelli Poche (1853-1880) Studies on the Europeans who lived in the Ottoman Empire have been mostly conducted through the Ottoman and European state archives. Few works on the social history are based on private papers, such as Beshara Doumani's work, Rediscovering Palestine: Merchants and Peasants in Jabal Nablus, 1700-1900 (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1995). As scholars of the Ottoman social history focus on the ethnic and religious minorities, foreigners, merchants, peasants, and women, such archives have become more precious than ever in order to reconstruct the story of understudied subjects. Ade's book takes its power from this background, as she skillfully uses the private archives of Poche and Marcopoli families, which were discovered in the 1990s. Comprised of two separate folios, the trade firms of both families kept chronologically archived accounting books, daily payments, warehouse books, and deadline records of payments from 1853 until 1921. Apart from family papers, there are memoirs, the archives of European vice-consulates, accounting and trade books, and documents from state archives in Aleppo, Istanbul, Paris and Nantes. After the Ottomans took over Aleppo, the city became a trade terminus for the mercantile coming from the Asia and a maritime link for European merchants. In a few decades time, most European consular representations and trade companies moved their centers from Damascus and Tripoli to Aleppo, which became the third largest urban center in the Ottoman realm after Istanbul and Cairo. Aleppo was not only in the middle of the empire but also a major city in the Arab territories on the cultural boundary of the Turkish and Arab population, which was made up of Kurds, Arabs, Turks, Christians, Jews and Bedouins. The city kept its status as one of the most active trade centers in the Eastern territories of the Ottoman Empire until late 19th century.
  • Topic: Reform
  • Political Geography: Europe, California, Palestine
  • Author: Sajjad H. Rizvi
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: The Story of Islamic Philosophy You cannot judge a book by its cover – or even its title. Now and then, a work comes along that forces us to take notice of what the author means by giving his work a particular title. Certainly, those who pick up The Story of Islamic Philosophy might expect a conventional history of the philosophical endeavour in the world of Islam, starting with the translation movement and the appropriation of Aristotelianism and ending with the 'eclipse' of 'rational discourse' in medieval mysticism and obscurantism. The study of philosophy in Islam is rather polarised: the traditional academic field of 'Arabic philosophy' starts with the Graeco-Arabica and is very much in the mould of understanding what the Arabs owed to the Greeks and then what the Latins owed the Arabs. This book is a story of Aristotle arabus and then latinus, and hence it is not surprising that the story culminates with the ultimate Aristotelian, Averroes. Many Arab intellectuals, such as the late Muḥammad ʿĀbid al-Jābirī, have been sympathetic to such readings and wished to revive a sort of Averroist Aristotelianism in the name of reason and enlightenment. In particular, they wished to save the Arab-Islamic heritage from its 'perversion' by the Persians, starting with Avicenna and Ghazālī who initiated the shift from reason and discourse to mystagogy and 'unreason.' The models for this tradition of philosophy are the Metaphysics and the Organon of Aristotle. However, the Greek heritage was always much more than Aristotle – Plato and the thoroughly neoplatonised Aristotle were critical. If anything, a serious historical engagement with the course of philosophy in the late antiquity period, on the cusp of the emergence of Islam, demonstrates that philosophy was much more than abstract reasoning, discourse and a linearity of proof.
  • Topic: Islam
  • Political Geography: Europe, Arabia
  • Author: David Phinnemore, Erhan İçener
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: This paper analyses the reasons for frustration and pessimism about Turkey-EU relations. It focuses on the impact of the crisis in Europe, the 2014 EP elections and selection of Jean- Claude Juncker for the Commission President post on Turkey\'s EU accession process. Finally, the paper tries to answer how the currentpessimism over Turkey-EU relations can be overcome.
  • Political Geography: Europe, Turkey, Arabia
  • Author: Ian Morrison
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: In recent years, religious pluralism has become the focus of intense debate in Europe - from controversies regarding religious clothing and symbols in the public sphere, to those related to limits on religious speech and the accommodation of religious practices - owing to the perception that pluralism has failed to contend with the purported incommensurability of Islam and European society. This article examines this purported crisis of religious pluralism in Europe and argues that while it is often depicted as resulting from the particularities of Islamic culture and theology, recent controversies point to a deeper crisis born of a historical failure to resolve the question of the governance of religious subjects.
  • Topic: Politics
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Sardar Aziz
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: This analysis offers an evaluation of the last three elections of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) in Iraq. These three elections included the regional parliamentary elections in September 2013, and the local and federal elections held simultaneously in April 2014. The KRG, as a federal region, exists in the north of Iraq where Kurds have managed their own affairs through a regional government since 1992. The KRG elections have very little in common with elections in the rest of Iraq. Compared to the rest of Iraq, the "region" has experienced a very different trajectory during the last two decades. As a postwar region, the KRG strives to solidify a stable democracy in a landlocked region, which suffers from minimal economic capital and weak democratic culture.
  • Topic: Government
  • Political Geography: Iraq, Europe
  • Author: Nurullah Ardiç
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: The main orientation of Turkish foreign policy has recently been described as Europeanization, Middle Easternization, or Islamization. This article offers an alternative reading of its discourse as a civilizational one, arguing that the concept of civilization has increasingly, albeit vaguely, been employed in Turkish foreign policy discourse in three different layers - national, regional and universal. Turkish foreign policy makers often invoke (and occasionally switch between) these different layers of civilization in a flexible manner, which adds dynamism to Turkish policies. Often integrated with the domestic and foreign policies of the AK Party government, this pragmatic discourse has proved useful for its proactive and assertive diplomacy. Based on the discourse analysis method, this article explores how and why the concept of civilization is utilized within this discourse.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, Government
  • Political Geography: Europe, Turkey
  • Author: Özge Zi̇hni̇oğlu
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: The EU has been successfully exercising its conditionality as a key aspect of its enlargement strategy since the 1990s. However, with no accession prospect in sight and the perceived lack of credibility and consistency of the EU's conditionality, Turkey's already unequal partnership with Europe has been thrown further off balance. This article argues that this is not the case, as the EU retains its leverage over Turkey, even in the absence of factors that are known as central to the successful implementation of the EU's conditionality. This article suggests two main reasons. First, despite the rhetoric on the interdependence of Turkish and the EU economy, this interdependence is not on equal footing and the Turkish economy is heavily dependent on the EU. Second, there is rising concern in Turkey over free trade talks between the EU and the United States, with its potential impact on the Turkish economy.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, Economics
  • Political Geography: United States, Europe, Turkey
  • Author: Bertil Emrah Oder
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: This edited volume on European constitutionalism is a compendium of essays with different interpretations on the constitutional authority and nature of the European Union (EU). This issue has faced various challenges in the last decade not only by national courts and referenda, but also vis-à-vis other international and regional actors, such as United Nations (UN) and European Court of Human Rights (ECHR).
  • Topic: Human Rights, International Law, United Nations
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Haitham Saad Aloudah
  • Publication Date: 10-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: Sa researcher interested in Turkish foreign policy and domestic politics, I was very captivated with the book's title as it entails an analysis of the way in which the EU reforms have impacted Turkey's human rights record and development. However, this also raises questions, such as what were the sources of the democratization and human rights reforms? Has the EU been the main force behind such transformation? Or, are there other domestic factors that we need to take into account as well? Such analysis enables us to draw significant conclusions on the development of the role of the police and other government control and protection tools in a human rights' context and evaluate possible causes of such reforms.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, Human Rights
  • Political Geography: Europe, Turkey
  • Author: Ulrike Guerot
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: As long as Angela Merkel remains chancellor, most Germans seem to be in no rush to find a coalition. This is why the coalition negotiations have been going on for weeks (and may only conclude when this journal goes to print). Nevertheless, the elections have shaken up the German political landscape: the Liberals (FDP) are out of the Bundestag for the first time since 1949 and the euro-sceptical Alternative for Germany (AfD) is in. With the Left Party still outside of the 'consensus spectrum', the Conservatives (CDU), Social Democrats (SPD) and Greens are the only parties eligible for government in either a grand coalition (CDU/SPD) or a Black-Green coalition (CDU/ Greens). But the SPD's reluctance to enter into a grand coalition a second time, after the disastrous results for the party in 2005-09, led many to hope for an innovative progressive-conservative U-turn in Germany, meaning a Black-Green coalition. Indeed, for a moment it seemed like the CDU and the Greens would dare the impossible after what had been called a "fruitful and harmonious exploration". But in the end, it is going to be a grand coalition again, with the likely effect for Europe that austerity will be softened a bit - but in essence, German European policy will remain as it is, slow and reluctant.
  • Topic: Government
  • Political Geography: Europe, Germany
  • Author: David Calleo
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: America's diplomacy towards Europe has passed two broad historic phases. A first, isolationist phase, determined in part by America's need to maintain its domestic multinational consensus, was replaced, after World War II and under the Soviet threat, by a policy of hegemonic engagement. The Soviet collapse opened a new era forcing a reinterpretation of America's role in Europe and the world. Four different narratives have emerged: triumphalist, declinist, chaotic or pluralist. If a unipolar American role seems unlikely to persist, American decline is all too possible. A new hegemonic replacement seems unlikely, which makes the pluralist narrative plausible and desirable. This multipolar world will require an adaptation of the Western alliance and a new way of thinking about interstate relations. Confederal Europe, for its experience in bargaining and conciliation, might have much to offer to the new plural world order.
  • Topic: War
  • Political Geography: America, Europe
  • Author: Susannah Verney
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: The Greek election of May 2012 failed to produce a government, resulting in repeat elections six weeks later. This shock outcome was a symptom of a broader delegitimation of the national political system. Over the past decade Eurobarometer data show a much more extensive loss of confidence in political institutions in Greece than in the European Union as a whole. In a first phase, rising political discontent was managed within the traditional political framework through alternation in power between the two major parties. In contrast, the second phase, following the outbreak of the Greek sovereign debt crisis, led to the dramatic fragmentation of the party system and changed the mode of government formation. This process is not reversible and entails serious democratic dangers.
  • Topic: Debt, Economics, Government
  • Political Geography: Europe, Greece
  • Author: Lorenzo Mosca
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: The enduring economic crisis, austerity measures and corruption scandals have created a favourable environment for the advent of new political actors all over Europe. During the last general elections (February 2013), Italy was shocked by the inexorable rise of the Five Star Movement. Beppe Grillo's creature upset the political system, occupying portions of the public sphere that had been ignored (the web) or gradually abandoned by traditional political parties (the squares). Its unusual campaigning style, its internet-based organisational structure, its atypical political positioning (beyond left and right), and its oversimplification of complex problems all help to explain its electoral performance, and distinguish it from similar anti-establishment parties that have emerged in Europe over the past decade.
  • Topic: Corruption, Economics, Environment
  • Political Geography: Europe, Italy
  • Author: Piergiorgio Corbetta, Renaldo Vignati
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: Italy is one the most europhile countries in the European Union. Nevertheless, as surveys show, over the last few years anti-European sentiments have increasingly surfaced among Italian citizens. Furthermore, there is now an important novelty regarding the relation between Italy and Europe: the Five Star Movement, a new party that expresses a peculiar and contradictory position towards Europe. Its leader, Beppe Grillo, sometimes advocates more, not less, unification, but he also proposes a referendum on Italian membership of the euro. Moreover, Grillo's blog frequently lends its voice to the choir of openly anti-European sentiment. Indeed, Grillo's call for direct democracy is plebiscitarian and his positions contribute to the weakening of a European project that is already facing grave difficulties of its own.
  • Political Geography: Europe, Italy
  • Author: Agustin Rossi
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: The European Data Protection Directive is often considered the Internet Privacy Global Standard, but this in only partially true. While the European Union sets a formal global standard, the 1995 Data Protection Directive has two loopholes that Internet companies exploit to set the effective global standard for internet privacy. The United States and Ireland have become safe harbours for Internet companies to collect and process Europeans' personal data without being subject to the stringent laws and regulations of some continental European countries. Companies, and not the European Union or governments, are the ones that set the effective global standard of internet privacy.
  • Topic: Government
  • Political Geography: United States, Europe, Ireland
  • Author: Daniel S. Hamilton
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: The United States is currently negotiating two massive regional economic agreements, one with 11 Asian and Pacific Rim countries and the other with the 28-member European Union. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) herald a substantial shift in US foreign economic policy as Washington turns its focus from the stalemated Doha Round of multilateral trade negotiations and scattered bilateral trade agreements to 'mega-regional' trade diplomacy. As the only party to both negotiations, Washington seeks to leverage issues in one to advance its interests in the other, while reinvigorating US global leadership.
  • Topic: Diplomacy, Economics
  • Political Geography: United States, Europe, Washington, Asia
  • Author: Filippa Chatzistavrou
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: In the post-Lisbon era and especially since the outburst of the financial and European sovereign debt crisis, the EU has been changing significantly, to the extent that the meaning and the process of integration are being affected. While constitutional asymmetry is a longstanding feature of the EU polity, the real challenge today is the expanding scope and fragmented character of newly established forms of flexibility, and how they are being used politically. The flexible configuration of integration reinforces a trend toward fragmented integration. Flexibility within the EU could become an end in itself, a device to serve a wide range of strategic visions and preferences in sectoral politics.
  • Topic: Politics, Sovereignty
  • Political Geography: Europe, Lisbon
  • Author: Isabelle Ioannides
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: The EU has increasingly intensified the link between its internal and external security concerns and needs, particularly in relation to its neighbours (the Western Balkans and the southern Mediterranean). This adaptation at legal, institutional, strategic and operational levels has sought to improve the coherence and effectiveness of EU external action. Yet, for the Union to tackle ongoing and new challenges in the immediate neighbourhood with today's financial and political constraints, it must be resourceful. The EU should make 'smart' use of its tools and capitalise on existing assets (reinforce the comprehensive approach, strengthen broad-based dialogue on security in the EU members states, and build relations of trust with third countries) to ensure that reforms in the immediate neighbourhood are sustainable, also for the benefit of long-term EU interests.
  • Topic: Security
  • Political Geography: Europe, Balkans
  • Author: Simone Tholens
  • Publication Date: 06-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: The European Commission has spelled out its policy ambition for EU energy cooperation with the southern neighbourhood with plans for the establishment of an 'Energy Community'. Its communications make clear that an Energy Community should be based on regulatory convergence with the EU acquis communautaire, much in the same vein as the existing institution carrying the same name; the Energy Community with Southeast Europe. It is puzzling that the Commission insists on repackaging this enlargement concept in a region with very different types of relationships vis-à-vis the EU, especially when considering the lukewarm position of key stakeholders in the field. According to them, any attempt to introduce a political integration model in this highly sensitive issue area in the politically fragmented MENA region might run the risk of hurting the incremental technical integration process that has slowly emerged over the past few years.
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Anthony Patt, Nadejda Komendantova, Stefan Pfenninger
  • Publication Date: 06-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: Solar power in the North African region has the potential to provide electricity for local energy needs and export to Europe. Nevertheless, despite the technical feasibility of solar energy projects, stakeholders still perceive projects in the region as risky because of existing governance issues. Certain areas of solar projects, such as construction, operation and management, are the most prone to governance risks, including lack of transparency and accountability, perceived as barriers for deployment of the projects. It is likely that large-scale foreign direct investment into solar energy will not eliminate existing risks, but might even increase them. Furthermore, the recent political changes in the region have addressed some governance risks but not all of them, especially bureaucratic corruption. Stakeholders recommend a broad set of measures to facilitate development of solar projects in the region, ranging from auditing of individual projects to simplification and unification of bureaucratic procedures.
  • Topic: Development, Governance
  • Political Geography: Europe, North Africa
  • Author: Mette Eilstrup-Sangiovanni
  • Publication Date: 06-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: Fifteen years ago, the European Union (EU) launched a Common European Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). Since then, the CSDP has been the focus of a growing body of political and scholarly evaluations. While most commentators have acknowledged shortfalls in European military capabilities, many remain cautiously optimistic about the CSDP's future. This article uses economic alliance theory to explain why EU member states have failed, so far, to create a potent common defence policy and to evaluate the policy's future prospects. It demonstrates, through theoretical, case study-based and statistical analysis, that CSDP is more prone to collective action problems than relevant institutional alternatives, and concludes that the best option for Europeans is to refocus attention fully on cooperation within a NATO framework.
  • Topic: Security, NATO, Economics
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Riccardo Alcaro, Aniseh Bassiri Tabrizi
  • Publication Date: 09-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: At the time of writing, representatives from Iran and the E3/EU+3 are trying to work out an agreement that will guarantee that Iran's controversial nuclear programme, widely suspected of having a military purpose, serves only peaceful ends. As the negotiations enter their most crucial phase, the time is ripe to attempt an assessment of the role played by the only actor, besides Iran, that has been on stage since it all began over ten years ago: Europe. Throughout this long drama, Europe's performance has had some brilliant moments. Yet the quality of its acting has decreased as a new protagonist, the US, has come on stage. Overall, the Europeans' record is positive, albeit not entirely spotless.
  • Political Geography: Europe, Iran
  • Author: Lorenzo Trombetta
  • Publication Date: 09-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: Seen through the eyes of Syrian activists and other observers based in the Middle East, EU policy towards Syria could in some ways appear inconsistent and ambiguous. In Brussels, EU representatives remind us that the Syrian crisis is the most difficult one the European Union has had to face so far, for the unprecedented scope of the humanitarian catastrophe, its geographic proximity to the Union's borders, and the difficulties in deciphering a fluid and multi-dimensional conflict. After more than three years since the eruption of violence, the EU is trying hard to play a pivotal role in the Syrian issue, despite the complexity of balancing its institutions, the different political sensibilities of its 28 member states, and the pressures exerted by influent external actors.
  • Political Geography: Europe, Middle East, Syria, Brussels
  • Author: Fabrizio Tassinari
  • Publication Date: 09-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: The European Union's sovereign debt and banking crisis has made apparent a gnawing gap between the northern and southern parts of Europe. Over the course of this past half decade, this divide has been brought into the public debate through a myriad of perspectives, from social trust to competitiveness. Yet, the governance sources of the divide are underestimated in policy practices and misrepresented in the political discourse. A governance approach can help clarify why the pursuit of convergence underpinning EU crisis-resolution mechanisms has become a contributing factor, rather than a prospective solution to the North-South gap. In doing so, governance also forms the basis for recommendations to policymakers in both halves of the continent, especially when confronted with the challenge of populist Euroscepticism.
  • Topic: Governance
  • Political Geography: Europe