Search

You searched for: Content Type Journal Article Remove constraint Content Type: Journal Article Political Geography Afghanistan Remove constraint Political Geography: Afghanistan Publication Year within 25 Years Remove constraint Publication Year: within 25 Years
Number of results to display per page

Search Results

  • Author: Khalid Homayun Nadiri
  • Publication Date: 01-2015
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: International Security
  • Institution: Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University
  • Abstract: Since September 11, 2001, Pakistan has pursued seemingly incongruous courses of action in Afghanistan. It has participated in the U.S. and international intervention in Afghanistan at the same time as it has permitted much of the Afghan Taliban's political leadership and many of its military commanders to visit or reside in Pakistani urban centers. This incongruence is all the more puzzling in light of the expansion of indiscriminate and costly violence directed against Islamabad by Pakistani groups affiliated with the Afghan Taliban. Pakistan's policy is the result not only of its enduring rivalry with India but also of historically rooted domestic imbalances and antagonistic relations with successive governments in Afghanistan. Three critical features of the Pakistani political system—the militarized nature of foreign policy making, ties between military institutions and Islamist networks, and the more recent rise of grassroots violence—have contributed to Pakistan's accommodation of the Afghan Taliban. Additionally, mutual suspicion surrounding the contentious Afghanistan-Pakistan border and Islamabad's long record of interference in Afghan politics have continued to divide Kabul and Islamabad, diminishing the prospect of cooperation between the two capitals. These determinants of Pakistan's foreign policy behavior reveal the prospects of and obstacles to resolving the numerous issues of contention that characterize the Afghanistan-Pakistan relationship today.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, Government, Politics
  • Political Geography: Pakistan, Afghanistan, United States, Taliban
  • Author: Danny Garrett-Rempel
  • Publication Date: 03-2015
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Military and Strategic Studies
  • Institution: Centre for Military and Strategic Studies
  • Abstract: In his book, It Takes More than a Network: The Iraqi Insurgency and Organizational Adaptation, Chad C. Serena attempts to analyze the organizational inputs and outputs of the Iraqi insurgency in an effort to arrive at a better understanding of what part these features played in both its initial success and eventual failure. The thesis of Serena's book is that the Iraqi insurgency failed to achieve longer-term organizational goals due to the fact that many of the insurgency's early organizational strengths later became weaknesses that degraded the insurgency's ability to adapt (4). Serena employs a blend of technical analysis, in his assessment of the inner workings of complex covert networks, and empirical examples, which he draws from the insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan. This approach is successful in providing insight into the nature of the organizational adaptation of the Iraqi insurgency as well as in laying a framework for the future study of similarly organized martial groups.
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, Iraq
  • Author: Sanaa Alimia
  • Publication Date: 05-2015
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Insight Turkey
  • Institution: SETA Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research
  • Abstract: Many Afghans, often male, in Pakistan are migrating (again) and increasingly toward 'new' destinations such as Turkey. Transnational lives are not unusual for Afghans as a method of survival, as well as a space for 'self-making'. However, these migrations are also the result of Turkey's own regional ambitions and projection of itself as a modern neoliberal 'Muslim' state. Moreover, increased migration is also a result of the historic role that cheap labor migrants, particularly from Central/South Asia, have played in the development of rising neoliberal economies. Thus in the 2000s and 2010s, as Turkey's 'star' rises, so too does Turkey find itself shifting from a migrant sending to a migrant receiving state.
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, Turkey, India
  • Author: Nigel Biggar
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Ethics International Affairs Journal
  • Institution: Carnegie Council
  • Abstract: The contemporary West is biased in favor of rebellion. This is attributable in the first place to the dominance of liberal political philosophy, according to which it is the power of the state that always poses the greatest threat to human well-being. But it is also because of consequent anti-imperialism, according to which any nationalist rebellion against imperial power is assumed to be its own justification. Autonomy, whether of the individual or of the nation, is reckoned to be the value that trumps all others. I surmise that it is because in liberal consciousness the word “rebel” connotes a morally heroic stance—because it means the opposite of “tyrant”—that Western media in recent years have preferred to refer to Iraqi opponents of the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq and Taliban opponents of the ISAF in Afghanistan not as “rebels,” but as “insurgents.”
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, Iraq, Taliban, Syria, Ireland
  • Author: Emmanuel Karagiannis
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The International Spectator
  • Institution: Istituto Affari Internazionali
  • Abstract: Western Muslims have joined jihadi groups in Afghanistan/Pakistan, Somalia and Syria to defend Islam from its perceived enemies. Transnational Islamist networks have played a pivotal role in bringing them to conflict zones by fulfilling three functions: radicalisation through mosques, radical preachers, and the Internet; recruitment which can be conducted either physically or digitally; and identity formation that provides the radicalised recruits with a larger cause to fight for as members of an imagined global community. Transnational Islamist networks are multifunctional entities on the rise.
  • Topic: Islam
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, Syria, Somalia
  • Author: Rayan Haddad
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures Conflits
  • Abstract: Une analyse relationnelle axée sur les logiques d'action concurrentes d' Al Qaïda 2 et du Hezbollah peut de prime abord surprendre le lecteur méconnaissant la scène moyen-orientale. Les deux parties, malgré leurs distinctions identitaires (et pas n'importe lesquelles puisque la division « sunnite / chiite » est un peu partout présentée comme la « clef de voûte analytique » d'un Orient finalement bien compliqué...), ne relèvent-elles pas finalement d'un même phénomène d'islamisme radical décrié par un grand nombre de médias contemporains ? L'approche peut de même provoquer un froncement de sourcils chez ceux qui connaissent mieux la géopolitique régionale. Malgré la similitude parfois de leur mode de violence opérationnel (« kamikaze »), la mouvance salafiste jihadiste n'est-elle pas la manifestation d'une contestation fanatique et déterritorialisée de l'ordre mondial, alors que le « parti de Dieu » s'inscrit dans l'optique de la libération (« légitime ») d'un territoire national ? Comment dès lors parler de concurrence ? Les deux parties n'ont pas les mêmes référents idéologiques (khomeynisme / salafisme), pas la même définition de leur champ d'action ni – par conséquent – la même hiérarchisation (effective et non rhétorique) de l'ennemi (Israël dans un cas, les Etats-Unis et l'Occident dans l'autre), pas les mêmes valeurs jihadistes (illégitimité / légitimité de prendre pour cible des civils occidentaux), pas la même organisation structurelle (fortement centralisée / décentralisée), et ne s'adresseraient pas a priori à un même public islamiste (localiste ou régionaliste d'une part, transnational de l'autre). En réalité, bien qu'elle soit virtuelle et à distance, l'objet de cet article est de montrer qu'il y a bel et bien dans certains cas concurrence idéologique entre le Hezbollah et Al Qaïda au niveau de la captation des cours et des esprits d'une audience panislamique mondiale, conduisant (peut-être parfois) à une logique de mimétisme, mais surtout à des stratégies de distinction entre les deux parties. Cette concurrence a pour toile de fond un contexte moyen-oriental où les sentiments anti-impérialistes battent son plein, et où l'on observe un processus de réactivation d'identités religieuses transfrontalières questionnant la légitimité de l'ordre régional. Nous proposons de présenter tout d'abord les contextes respectifs d'émergence des contestations khomeynistes et salafistes jihadistes.
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan
  • Author: Christian Olsson
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures Conflits
  • Abstract: "Cada vez que los incidentes de guerra obligan a uno de nuestros oficiales a actuar contra una población [...], no debe olvidar que su primera preocupación, una vez que se haya obtenido la sumisión de sus habitantes, ha de ser la de reconstruir dicha población, crear un mercado, construir una escuela. La pacificación del país y, más tarde, la organización que se le ha de otorgar, han de resultar de la acción de la política y de la fuerza". General Gallieni, instrucciones fundamentales del 22 de mayo de 1898 en Madagascar.
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, Iraq
  • Author: Massimiiliano Guareschi, Maurizio Guerri
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures Conflits
  • Abstract: Il devient chaque jour plus difficile de tenter de déterminer la forme-guerre car la seule règle manifeste de la violence est de n'en avoir aucune, si ce n'est celle d'avoir lieu de manière ubiquiste, changeante, equivoque. Les visages ou les masques qu'elle assume aujourd'hui sont, tour à tour, le choc des civilisations, la guerre de religion, les opérations de police internationale, la lutte contre la terreur voire la diffusion du progrès et de la démocratie. Dans les guerres contemporaines, de nouveaux combattants se mêlent et se superposent aux anciens guerriers : soldats réguliers et irréguliers, mercenaires, agents secrets, terroristes, pirates et kamikazes. C'est pour cette raison que l'idée de tenter de déterminer les contours de la guerre à travers la figure des combattants, ceux qui risquent leur vie pour donner la mort, représente un passage difficile mais nécessaire afin de ne pas tomber dans ce que Jacques Derrida a appelé « le sommeil dogmatique », c'est-à-dire l'usage des lieux communs exploités en permanence par le journalisme et par les administrations gouvernementales qui partent toujours du présupposé que les significations respectives de « guerre » et « paix », de « démocra- tie » et de « terrorisme » sont évidentes. Si nous voulons tenter de comprendre les dynamiques actuelles, nous devons abandonner la conviction tranquillisante et très répandue selon laquelle il y a dans ces termes quelque chose de tenu pour acquis, quelque chose qui peut être abandonné au préjugé du soi-disant « sens commun ». Durant ces dernières années, des analyses approfondies de caractère juridique, politique, philosophique se sont unies à des protestations de masse pour dénoncer l'absence de clarté des termes « war » et « terrorism » dans le slogan « war on terrorism ». Cependant, malgré tout ce qu'il y a d'« obscur, de dogmatique ou de pré-critique », cela « n'empêche pas les pouvoirs prétendus légitimes de s'en servir quand cela leur semble opportun ».
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan
  • Author: Alain Brosset
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures Conflits
  • Abstract: On a vu apparaître ces dernières années, dans le vocabulaire de la contreterreur développée par l'administration des Etats-Unis, une nouvelle expression – « extraordinary rendition » – que l'on traduit généralement en français par « transferts spéciaux ». Nous allons tenter ici de poser quelques questions actuelles à propos de la souveraineté et des frontières, en partant des dispositifs et des usages que suppose cette notion.
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan
  • Author: Luis Martinez
  • Publication Date: 04-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Cultures Conflits
  • Institution: Cultures Conflits
  • Abstract: Comment expliquer l'attrait pour le courant jihadiste de certains jeunes musulmans en France ? Cet article montre comment se construit la justification de la radicalisation et les étapes qui rendent légitime le passage à l'acte violent. Le processus de justification du passage à l'acte violent - à l'attentat-suicide par exemple - s'inscrit dans un contexte qu'il faut comprendre : quelles sont « les structures sociales et organisationnelles qui peuvent promouvoir dans un moment donné, l'attentat-suicide ? ». Aussi, l'analyse du basculement dans la violence doit-elle recontextualiser les engagements et les trajectoires individuelles, car l'environnement dans lequel se construit le processus de justification apparaît comme déterminant. Le basculement dans la violence n'est pas le produit d'une frustration ou d'un symptôme psychologique. L'attentat-suicide, par exemple, est un véritable instrument de guerre. Il a un sens, répond à une logique et s'inscrit dans une finalité : un territoire à libérer, une communauté à reconquérir . Les entretiens réalisés auprès de jeunes musulmans d'origine nord-africaine permettent ici de souligner comment se construit la justification du passage à l'acte violent ; ils permettent aussi de comprendre que, pour que l'acte violent se réalise, des conditions générales et structurelles sont nécessaires, sans quoi la justification du passage reste de l'ordre du discours.
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, America