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  • Author: Jochen von Bernstorff
  • Publication Date: 05-2015
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: Global economic justice as a topic of moral philosophy and international law is back on the intellectual agenda and figures prominently in feuilletons, blogs and academic publications. A wave of recent studies by both international lawyers and moral philosophers on the dark side of economic globalization and the role of international law in this context is as such a remarkable phenomenon. The essay engages with diverging scholarly perspectives on global justice and international law as represented in the four volumes under review. Three substantive questions structure the non-comprehensive sketch of the global justice debate: (i) Is the current international economic order unjust? (ii) Can existing international legal rules and institutions be transformed or developed into a more just economic order? (iii) What is the potential role of international lawyers in this context?
  • Topic: Economics, Globalization, International Law
  • Author: Ekaterina Yahyaoui Krivenko
  • Publication Date: 04-2015
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: A poem by Ekaterina Yahyaoui Krivenko.
  • Topic: Globalization, Human Rights, International Law, Constitution
  • Political Geography: Europe, Global Focus
  • Author: Lars Viellechner
  • Publication Date: 07-2015
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: The two collections fill a major gap in law and globalization scholarship. In rich detail, they supply empirical material on the current transformation of law that has long been sought after. The studies in the first volume stand out in particular as they employ methods of empirical social research and focus on change in non-Western countries. From this material, other researchers will greatly benefit in the years to come. At the same time, the two volumes add a highly convincing conceptual approach to the field. Indeed, their guiding category of the transnational is very promising in contrast to many others proposed for similar purposes. As the editors properly assert, it best expresses that most patterns of order neither reach out globally nor circumvent the state. Indeed, the recursive interaction of different levels of order appears to be one of the dominating modes of law production today, which is well captured by the term. Nevertheless, some obscurity and doubt about the conceptions of transnational legal ordering and order remain.
  • Topic: Globalization, International Law, Sociology, Legal Theory
  • Political Geography: Europe, Asia, North America
  • Author: David S. Koller
  • Publication Date: 02-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: This article responds to Daniel Bethlehem's assertions that globalization is diminishing the importance of geography, and thereby challenging the Westphalian order on which international law is constructed. It contends that international law does not take geography as it is but actively creates and sustains a state-based geography. It argues that the challenges Bethlehem identifies are not new but are inherent in international law's efforts to impose a state-based order on a global world. The question is not whether international lawyers will respond to these challenges, but how they will respond. Will they follow Bethlehem in reinforcing a statist order, or will they place sovereignty of states in the service of the global human community?
  • Topic: Globalization, International Law
  • Political Geography: New York, Europe
  • Author: Claus D. Zimmermann
  • Publication Date: 11-2013
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: Few legal concepts have been subject to as little critical scrutiny over the past few decades as that of monetary sovereignty. This stands in contrast to the renewed interest in different aspects of broader concepts of sovereignty. Filling this important gap in the literature, this article examines whether the concept of monetary sovereignty is subject to evolution under the impact of globalization and financial integration. This article fully takes into account the dual nature of monetary sovereignty as a concept with not only positive but also important normative components. It is argued herein that the concept of monetary sovereignty is more than a mere framework for debates on rights and duties of states, but that it is still relevant as a legal concept for evaluating the contemporary exercise of sovereign powers in the realm of money and for improving our understanding of the driving forces behind the evolution of the law in this crucial field. After a review of the conceptual foundations of monetary sovereignty, this article assesses its conceptual evolution under the impact of contemporary constraints on its exercise, and examines the main implications of the proposed new understanding of monetary sovereignty, with its normative components providing normative guidance and serving as a legitimacy benchmark.
  • Topic: Globalization
  • Author: B.S. Chimni
  • Publication Date: 02-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: This article offers an introduction to a class approach to international law. It challenges the 'death of class' thesis and argues for the continued relevance of the category of 'class'. Among other things, the contention is that the category of 'class' subsumes without erasing the gender and race divides. Noting the emergence of a global social formation the article claims that a transnational capitalist class is shaping international laws and institutions in the era of globalization. It calls for the linking of the class critique of contemporary laws and institutions with the idea and practices of resistance, and considers in this setting the meaning of internationalism and class struggle today for an emerging transnational oppressed class. The article concludes by schematically outlining the advantages of a class approach to international law.
  • Topic: Globalization, International Law
  • Author: S├ębastien Jodoin
  • Publication Date: 04-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: Scholars and policymakers have only recently begun to develop a rigorous understanding of the relationship between trade and human rights. The authors of the present book seek to provide readers with greater insight into this relationship, with the ultimate aim of helping policymakers to better govern globalization.
  • Topic: Globalization
  • Author: Tom Ginsburg
  • Publication Date: 11-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: The application of the tools of international relations, particularly those associated with rational choice analysis, to problems of international law has generated many important insights in the last two decades. In a recent issue of this Journal, Eyal Benvenisti and George Downs, two scholars who individually and jointly have contributed much to this research programme, provide a fascinating interpretation of a recent trend in democracies toward judicial constraint of executives in foreign affairs matters. Placing this development in the broader context of inter-judicial cooperation and globalization, they argue that courts are increasingly coordinating across borders to constrain their national executives. This requires resolution of a transnational collective action problem among judges. The piece is creative, well-argued, and might even be correct. But, as I will argue, it might not be. The fact that courts cooperate and coordinate is observationally equivalent to other plausible theories of what courts are doing. These theories are simpler and also consistent with the basic story Benvenisti and Downs want to tell.
  • Topic: Globalization
  • Political Geography: United States