Search

You searched for: Content Type Journal Article Remove constraint Content Type: Journal Article Publishing Institution Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies Topic Communications Remove constraint Topic: Communications
Number of results to display per page

Search Results

  • Author: Tim Clarke
  • Publication Date: 02-2019
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Military and Strategic Studies
  • Institution: Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies
  • Abstract: During the First World War Indigenous peoples in Canada contributed to the war effort through enlistment in the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), the Patriotic Fund, and agricultural and industrial production. Their contributions, however, were not universally accepted in Indigenous communities. For many aging, non-military eligible, individuals, enlistment and off-reserve work deprived families of care-givers, bread-winners, and youth, essential to household and community well-being. Their petitions to the Canadian government, filtered through the Department of Indian Affairs (DIA), reveal the breadth of opinion and sources of frustration from across Indigenous communities in Canada. For the DIA, however, the years from 1914-1918 provided a crucial opportunity to solidify its power over Indigenous communities. Through a three-pillared archetype of communication control, the DIA increased its unilateral dominion over Indigenous affairs, largely at the expense of the eldest members of Indigenous communities, remaining traditional governance structures, and especially women. While the DIA rightly lauded Indigenous contributions to Canada’s war effort in post-war declarations, it conveniently ignored the costs associated with such contributions, thus denying a crucial aspect of Indigenous First World War history; an omission historians have too often indulged.
  • Topic: Communications, Military Strategy, World War I, Indigenous, Indian Affairs
  • Political Geography: Canada, North America
  • Author: Sten Rynning
  • Publication Date: 03-2014
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Military and Strategic Studies
  • Institution: Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies
  • Abstract: The melting of ice in the Arctic has mobilised considerable analytical interest in the region. New resources such as minerals, fisheries, and oil and gas, as well as new sea lines of communication become available, promising to connect Asia and the Atlantic more intimately and efficiently. On this, there is widespread agreement. The implications are more difficult to gauge, though, as the underlying order is in flux. It is not clear what kind of era this opening of the Arctic is heralding.
  • Topic: Communications
  • Political Geography: Asia, Atlantic Ocean
  • Author: Harvey Rishikof, Bernard Horowitz
  • Publication Date: 10-2012
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Military and Strategic Studies
  • Institution: Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies
  • Abstract: Under strain exerted by the internet boom of the early 2000's, the legal framework of boundaries applied to commerce, communications, law enforcement and even some aspects of armed conflict began to groan and fracture. Obsolescence was temporarily postponed by buttressing; one key reform of the USA PATRIOT Act was that it characterized internet service companies as communications providers. Police access to voicemail was directed through wiretap warrants rather than physical searches. Old communications-related statutes were adapted and “duct-taped.” Over the past couple of years, however, these fractures have grown to such magnitude that the old framework may no longer be adjusted to keep pace; it finally may be shattering.
  • Topic: Communications
  • Political Geography: United States