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You searched for: Content Type Journal Article Remove constraint Content Type: Journal Article Publishing Institution Academy of Political Science Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Academy of Political Science Topic International Relations Remove constraint Topic: International Relations
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  • Author: Sabrina Zirkel
  • Publication Date: 01-2015
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: At this 60th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, Jeffrey D. Hockett offers us a new interpretation of the dilemmas, debates, and deliberations that members of the Court engaged in on their way to this decision. Hockett challenges conceptualizations of the decision in Brown as emerging purely from any one set of motives and that it can be analyzed through only one theoretical or methodological lens. Instead, he argues through painstaking review of the discussions between the justices about the case and early drafts of opinions that different justices were swayed by different arguments, took into account different considerations, and made different compromises. In short: There was no “one” road to Brown v. Board—there were potentially as many paths as there were justices. - See more at: http://www.psqonline.org/article.cfm?IDArticle=19333#sthash.mXg1UKS3.dpuf
  • Topic: International Relations, Education, Politics, Law
  • Political Geography: America
  • Author: Stephen Macekura
  • Publication Date: 04-2013
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: STEPHEN MACEKURA explores the intellectual roots and policy precedents of President Harry Truman's Point Four program. He argues that many of the ideas and policies encapsulated in Point Four helped to shape the extensive foreign aid, economic development, and modernization policies of the Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy administrations.
  • Topic: International Relations
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Bidisha Biswas
  • Publication Date: 09-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: In a theoretically rich study, David Lake challenges the long-prevailing academic notion that the international system is characterized by anarchy. Many existing studies are predicated on the notion that states are sovereign, answer to no higher authority, and are therefore entirely reliant on self-help. Lake points out that the world is, in fact, marked by hierarchy, where weaker states submit to rules created by more-powerful states. This hierarchical relationship is based on a mutual give and take. Dominant states provide essential services such as security and order. The legitimacy deriving from the provision of such functions is essential to maintaining the hierarchy. Of course, the leading powers also benefit from the relationship. In a way, therefore, hierarchy in the international system is a form of interdependence. This is certainly a novel and thought-provoking idea.
  • Topic: International Relations
  • Author: Christopher J. Fettweis
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: At his trial, the terrorist explained that he had bombed the crowded café because he harbored a “profound hatred, intensified every day by the revolting spectacle of society where all is base, all is cowardly.” He explained that women and children were legitimate targets because his enemies never spared civilian lives. Although he was surely headed for execution, the terrorist issued ominous warnings for civilization, predicting that his movement would never die. It was “everywhere, which makes it impossible to capture.” It would end only when justice was achieved—and when its enemies were dead. His fanaticism seems entirely typical of twenty-first century terrorism, which seems far more dangerous and threatening to society than any that has come before.
  • Topic: International Relations
  • Political Geography: America