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  • Author: Robert Shapiro
  • Publication Date: 08-2012
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: There are two especially central problems that the authors cannot over- come. First, the authors' tendency to favor abstractions over specifics leads them to overlook or downplay evidence that executive power has been limited by the rule of law. The Supreme Court blocked the Harry Truman administration from seizing steel factories during the Korean War (the Truman administration made essentially the same argument to the District Court about executive power that the authors endorse); the Court and Congress used legal allegations and conclusions to effectively force Richard Nixon out of office; the Court compelled Bill Clinton to sit for a deposition. The authors do not precisely date the alleged demise of the rule of law, but even more-recent examples of the rule of law's continued relevance exist. In 2004, Department of Justice attorneys forced the George W. Bush administration to modify a secret surveillance program after the attorneys, who believed the program was illegal, threatened to resign.
  • Topic: Health, Public Opinion
  • Political Geography: America
  • Author: Raymond A. Smith
  • Publication Date: 08-2012
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: The “big picture” political book has become a staple of political campaigns, in which high-profile politicians diagnose the full range of problems besetting the country and present their broad agenda for change; Barack Obamaʼs The Audacity of Hope is perhaps only the best known of these volumes. Authors without such a preexisting audience tend to either rely on a single “big idea” to tie together their books or else provide original data with detailed policy analysis in order to persuade readers. Thomas L. Friedmanʼs various concept-driven books fit into the prior category, while the work of most rank-and-file social scientists falls into the latter mode.
  • Political Geography: America
  • Author: Daniel Skinner
  • Publication Date: 08-2012
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: While the impact of Barack Obamaʼs 2010 health care initiative will not be known for some time, Stuart Altman and David Shactman make clear that it was a long time coming. Altman himself was directly involved in the reform efforts of Obama and Richard Nixon, and was bitter for having been sidelined by Bill Clinton. The book reads as a recounting of lessons learned during the Nixon administration, anger for Clinton ʼ s refusal to heed those lessons, and ultimate redemption with the passage of health care reform under Obama, when Altman was brought back into the fold. At its best, the book recounts the twists and turns of a longstanding quest for a better American health care system.
  • Topic: Health
  • Political Geography: America
  • Author: Meena Bose
  • Publication Date: 08-2012
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: In the twenty-first century, the numerous and diverse challenges — security, economic, political — that the United States faces in a highly interdependent internationalsystempointtotheneedforanoverarchinggrandstrategytoguide foreign policy making. But the obstacles to developing such a strategy can be daunting, both substantively, in identifying long-term interests and the resources to achieve them, and politically, in building support for a doctrine to reshape policy priorities and choices. Peter Trubowitzʼs ambitious undertaking to examine the development of grand strategy from the origins of the American Republic to the present significantly advances prospects for achieving such far-reaching goals.
  • Topic: Security
  • Political Geography: United States, America
  • Author: Jonathan D. Caverley
  • Publication Date: 08-2012
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: In attacking neoconservatism, this book does not launch a broadside so much as unleash the Samson option. Like Israelʼs all-azimuth nuclear doctrine, it scores many hits at the cost of the precision required for the offensive. Rather, its battering of concepts only partially linked to neoconservatism — Neoliberalism, the “American Right,” theconceptofpolyarchy — makes American Neoconser- vatism adefenseof “progressive politics” (p. 3) against a multitude of forces threatening to overrun it.
  • Political Geography: America, Israel
  • Author: Katy Harriger
  • Publication Date: 08-2012
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: The reconciliation of judicial power with democracy has preoccupied American scholars and politicians since the Founding era. The counter-majoritarian difficulty of life-tenured judges overturning the work of the democratic branches has sometimes been justified as essential to a written constitution that aims to limit the power of government and control majority tyranny. Others have criticized the exercise of judicial power as undemocratic and illegitimate. Over the centuries, presidents, candidates for the presidency, and members of Congress have used various tools at their disposal to challenge the Supreme Court and its exercise of power. And yet, despite this persistent questioning of the Courtʼs legitimacy, its place in the American political system appears more fixed and more important than it has ever been. How should we understand this seemingly contradictory development?
  • Political Geography: America
  • Author: Casey A. Klofstad
  • Publication Date: 08-2012
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: Over the past half-century, Americans have withdrawn from numerous forms of civic participation, from voting, to voluntarism, and everything else in between. A standard explanation for this phenomenon is generational replacement; each generation since the World War II “Greatest Generation” has been less civically active. Henry Milner enters this dialogue by examining the coming-of-age “Internet Generation.” Using data sources from different countries, Milner argues that this generation is woefully inactive in politics. He worries that this high frequency of “political dropouts” leaves the Internet Generation unprepared to battle the political challenges they will face over their lifetimes.
  • Topic: War
  • Political Geography: America
  • Author: Harvey B. Feigenbaum
  • Publication Date: 05-2011
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: HARVEY B. FEIGENBAUM discusses the economic and cultural reasons for the spread of American pop culture and finds that political complaints by many countries about “Americanization” are well founded.
  • Topic: Economics
  • Political Geography: America
  • Author: Eric Kasper
  • Publication Date: 10-2011
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: Eric T. Kasper examines the use of Magna Carta by U.S. federal courts in enemy combatant cases. He traces the history of due process, jury trial, and habeas corpus rights within Magna Carta as well as subsequent legal documents and rulings in England and America. He concludes that Magna Carta is properly used by the federal courts as persuasive authority to limit executive power in the war on terror.
  • Political Geography: United States, America, England
  • Author: David Campbell, Robert Putna
  • Publication Date: 10-2011
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Political Science Quarterly
  • Institution: Academy of Political Science
  • Abstract: David E. Campbell and Robert D. Putnam ask how America can simultaneously be religiously devout, religiously diverse, and religiously tolerant. They argue that America's relative religious harmony lies in the frequency of “religious bridging.” Almost all Americans have a friend or close family member of another religion, and these personal relationships keep America's religious melting pot from boiling over.
  • Political Geography: America