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You searched for: Content Type Commentary and Analysis Remove constraint Content Type: Commentary and Analysis Publishing Institution Berkeley APEC Study Center Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Berkeley APEC Study Center Political Geography Global Focus Remove constraint Political Geography: Global Focus Publication Year within 10 Years Remove constraint Publication Year: within 10 Years Topic International Affairs Remove constraint Topic: International Affairs
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  • Author: Vinod K. Aggarwal
  • Publication Date: 11-2019
  • Content Type: Commentary and Analysis
  • Institution: Berkeley APEC Study Center
  • Abstract: Industrial policy in cybersecurity: Origins, evolution and implications
  • Topic: International Affairs, Cybersecurity
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Vinod K. Aggarwal
  • Publication Date: 11-2018
  • Content Type: Commentary and Analysis
  • Institution: Berkeley APEC Study Center
  • Abstract: During negotiations of mega-regional trade agreements, state representatives have the incentive to demand that other parties align with their entrenched regulatory practices. Indeed, a country’s exporters will derive extensive benefits if negotiating partners fulfill these demands. Strictly pursuing self-interest, however, often leads to stalemate. When the United States (US) and European Union (EU) entered into negotiations of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), they sought to more effectively align transatlantic regulation and associated practices. Although extant literature indicates that relatively similar, rich, and developed countries should easily conclude agreements due to shared interests, negotiations between the US and EU in the regulatory area of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) deteriorated. By 2016, this matter effectively fell off the TTIP negotiating agenda.
  • Topic: Science and Technology, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Vinod K Aggarwal
  • Publication Date: 11-2017
  • Content Type: Commentary and Analysis
  • Institution: Berkeley APEC Study Center
  • Abstract: Given the hotly contested U.S. presidential election and the surprising victory of Donald Trump, followed by the flurry of executive actions, it is easy to lose sight of the broader challenges to the U.S.-promoted post-Second World War economic order. My analysis proceeds in four parts. First, I consider how we have moved away from multilateral to bilateral trade negotiations. Second, I consider how the consensus for a liberal trade order has frayed, focusing on systemic changes, U.S. domestic political economic conflicts, and a rethinking of the ideological consensus around the benefits of free trade. Third, I highlight factors that drove the demise of TPP. I conclude by looking at the future of trade accords in the Asia-Pacific.
  • Topic: International Political Economy, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Vinod K Aggarwal
  • Publication Date: 01-2017
  • Content Type: Commentary and Analysis
  • Institution: Berkeley APEC Study Center
  • Abstract: For decades, first under the auspices of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and then its successor organization the World Trade Organization (WTO), countries successfully negotiated the reduction of both tariffs and nontariff barriers every few years. But in December 2015, after 14 years of fruitless negotiations, WTO members terminated the Doha Round.
  • Topic: International Political Economy, International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Vinod K Aggarwal
  • Publication Date: 12-2015
  • Content Type: Commentary and Analysis
  • Institution: Berkeley APEC Study Center
  • Abstract: In the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis of 2007- 08, observers of international markets disagreed about the likely response of the World Trade Organization.1 Pointing to a contraction of global trade flows by 9 percent in 2009, some commentators suggested that the WTO’s rules were incapable of stemming a tide of increasing protectionism.2 Still, others cautioned that overzealous regulation of national industrial policies by the WTO would limit distressed governments’ ability to cope. Who was right?
  • Topic: International Affairs
  • Political Geography: Global Focus