Search

You searched for: Publication Year within 25 Years Remove constraint Publication Year: within 25 Years Journal European Journal of International Law Remove constraint Journal: European Journal of International Law Topic Human Rights Remove constraint Topic: Human Rights
Number of results to display per page

Search Results

  • Author: Jaye Ellis
  • Publication Date: 11-2011
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: This article explores the source 'general principles of international law' from the point of view of comparative law scholarship. The currently accepted definition of general principles and methodology for identifying such principles are critiqued. The criterion of the representativeness of the major families of legal systems, to which courts and tribunals tend to pay lip service rather than applying rigorously, is meant to anchor general principles in state consent, but is not a sound technique either for identifying principles of relevance to international law or for preventing judges from referring only to the legal systems they know best. Further - more, the emphasis on extracting the essence of rules results in leaving behind most of what is interesting and useful in what judges may have learned by studying municipal legal systems. Comparative scholarship is an obvious, rich, and strangely neglected source of guidance for international judges who wish to draw insights from legal systems outside international law.
  • Topic: Human Rights, International Law
  • Political Geography: Sri Lanka
  • Author: Thilo Rensmann
  • Publication Date: 11-2011
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: As a tribute to Bruno Simma on the occasion of his 70th birthday this article follows the traces of two of his fellow alumni from Munich University who belonged to the first generation of 'droit-de-l'hommistes'. In the early 1940s they laid the foundations for the entrenchment of human rights in the international legal order. Ernst Rabel and Karl Loewenstein, who taught in Munich during the inter-war period, each played a significant role in breaking the mould of isolationism prevalent in German legal scholarship at the time. Hitler's rise to power, however, put an abrupt end to the internationalization of legal thought in Germany. Rabel and Loewenstein, like many other legal scholars of Jewish descent, were forced into exile. It so happened that in 1942 the two Munich alumni were invited by the American Law Institute to join a committee 'representing the major cultures of the world'. This committee was charged with the momentous task of drafting an international bill of rights for a new post-war global order. Their draft was later to become the single most important blueprint for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Against this backdrop the article attempts to identify the specific contribution made by Rabel and Loewenstein to the evolution of international human rights law.
  • Topic: Human Rights
  • Political Geography: Germany
  • Author: Sonia Morano-Foadi, Stelios Andreadakis
  • Publication Date: 11-2011
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: This article, based on a broader project, focuses on the interaction between the two European Courts (the Court of Justice of the European Union – ECJ and the European Court of Human Rights – ECtHR) and uses the specific area of expulsion/deportation of third country nationals (non-EU nationals) from European territory as a case study. The work examines the ECJ's and ECtHR's divergent approaches in this area of law, and it then provides some preliminary reflections on the potential of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights and the EU's accession to the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR) to achieve a more harmonious and convergent human rights system in Europe. It finally argues that the post-Lisbon era has the potential to enhance the protection of fundamental rights within the continent.
  • Topic: Human Rights
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Publication Date: 02-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: There are few legal issues which still manage to evoke civic passion in the wider population. Increasingly, and sometimes for the wrong reasons, the place of religion in our public spaces has become one of them. In the age of the internet and Google we can safely assume that all readers of this Journal will have either read the Lautsi decision of the European Court of Human Rights or have read about it, thus obviating the need for the usual preliminaries. As is known, a Chamber of the Court held that the displaying in Italian public schools of the crucifix was a violation of the European Convention on Human Rights.
  • Topic: Human Rights
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Christian Tomuschat
  • Publication Date: 02-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: It is recognized today that human rights law is not generally displaced in times of armed conflict by international humanitarian law (IHL). Yet in large part this new insight remains to be particularized as to its actual consequences. In particular, IHL is still predominantly under the influence of the concept of military necessity.
  • Topic: Human Rights
  • Author: Francesco Francioni
  • Publication Date: 02-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: This paper argues that, in spite of recent judicial practice contributing to the integration of environmental considerations in human rights adjudication, progress in this field remains limited. This is so because of the prevailing 'individualistic' perspective in which human rights courts place the environmental dimension of human rights. This results in a reductionist approach which is not consistent with the inherent nature of the environment as a public good indispensable for the life and welfare of society as a whole. The article, rather than advocating the recognition of an independent right to a clean environment, presents a plea for a more imaginative approach based on the consideration of the collective-social dimension of human rights affected by environmental degradation.
  • Topic: Environment, Human Rights
  • Author: Wolfgang S. Heinz
  • Publication Date: 02-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: Two renowned scholars of international human rights protection from the University of Berne offer this excellent volume which is based on and expands the second edition of their book Universeller Menschenrechtsschutz (2008). Professor Walter Kälin was representative of the UN Secretary General on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons, and from 2003 to 2008 a member of the UN Human Rights Committee. Jörg Künzli is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Berne.
  • Topic: Human Rights
  • Political Geography: United Nations
  • Author: Lucas Lixinski
  • Publication Date: 08-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: The article examines the jurisprudence of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in several areas of adjudication which initially did not fall under the instrument, such as environmental rights, international humanitarian law, and investors' rights. In all these areas, the Court has used instruments 'foreign' to the Inter-American system as a means to expand the content of rights in the American Convention. As a result, the umbrella of protection of this instrument, and the reach of the Court, is far greater than originally envisaged. After analysing the specific provision on interpretation of the American Convention on Human Rights as compared to the equivalent mechanisms in the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, the article analyses several case studies of expansionism in the case law of the Court, asking throughout the analysis the question whether this helps the unity or the fragmentation of international law. The article argues that this exercise in expansionism, albeit imperfect, eventually contributes to the unity of international law. In this sense, this expansionism happens within controlled boundaries, and the use of external instruments is more of a validation of findings the Court could make based solely on the Inter-American instruments, rarely creating new rights.
  • Topic: Human Rights, International Law
  • Political Geography: America, Vienna
  • Author: Juliet Chevalier-Watts
  • Publication Date: 08-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: Articles 1 and 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights, when read together, require a proper and adequate official investigation into deaths resulting from the actions of state agents, both from the use of lethal force, and also in situations arising from the negligence of agents that leads to a death. The article considers the extent of the obligation to carry out an effective investigation since its explicit recognition by the European Court of Human Rights in the case of McCann and Others v. United Kingdom. The article assesses the jurisprudence of the duty to investigate in order to determine whether the obligation is now placing too onerous a burden on member states in order to comply with their duties under the Convention, or whether the duty does indeed secure the right to life, as is intended. To assess the original proposition, the article considers the jurisprudence of the duty to investigate in relation to the following applications: early forays into the application of the duty; fatalities arising from non-lethal force; the influential quartet of cases arising out of the Northern Ireland troubles; recent judgments concerning cases arising out of the conflict in Chechnya; and finally through to a critical review of the effectiveness of the European Court.
  • Topic: Human Rights
  • Political Geography: United Kingdom, Europe
  • Author: Sergio Dellavalle
  • Publication Date: 08-2010
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: European Journal of International Law
  • Institution: European Journal of International Law
  • Abstract: Daniele Archibugi. The Global Commonwealth of Citizens: Toward Cosmopolitan Democracy. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008. Pp. 298. $29.95. ISBN: 9780691134901. Anthony Carty. Philosophy of International Law. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007. Pp. 255. $80.00. ISBN: 9780748622559. Andrew Hurrell. On Global Order: Power, Values, and the Constitution of International Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. 354. £65.00. ISBN: 9780199233106. Peter Niesen, , Benjamin Herborth (eds.). Anarchie der kommunikativen Freiheit. Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp, 2007. Pp. 765€16.00. ISBN: 9783518294208. Mortimer N. S. Sellers. Republican Principles in International Law: The Fundamental Requirements of a Just World Order. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. Pp. 266. £65.00. ISBN: 9781403997449. Helen M. Stacy. Human Rights for the 21st Century: Sovereignty, Civil Society, Culture. Stanford (California)Stanford University Press, 2009. Pp. 260. $21.95. ISBN: 9780804760959. Abstract Theories of global order are traceable back to two main paradigms, particularism and universalism, the first of them asserting that true global order is a chimaera, the second affirming that a worldwide political and legal system securing peace and human rights protection is both desirable and feasible. Against this background, the article analyses some recent contributions to the question of the conditions for the establishment of a worldwide system guaranteeing peaceful and cooperative interaction. The authors of the books under review share the commitment to the universalistic view, but substantiate it by resorting to distinct theoretical presuppositions. By outlining the different frameworks, the article presents the books being discussed as inspiring inputs on the way to the renewal of universalism at the beginning of the 21st century.
  • Topic: Human Rights