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  • Author: Rachel Stohl, Winslow Wheeler, Mark Burgess, Marta Conti, Monica Czwarno, Ana Marte
  • Publication Date: 10-2007
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: Six years Ago, the United States began its operations in Afghanistan in response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. At the time, scant attention was paid to the dangers of landmines, unexploded ordnance and small arms that plagued the country. Now, six years later, U.S. and coalition military forces serving in Afghanistan continue to face a variety of dangers, beyond the unfriendly geography and resurgent Taliban forces. Troops supporting the international Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and operation enduring Freedom (OEF) face additional challenges from landmines, unexploded ordnance, man-portable air defense systems and other small arms.
  • Topic: Defense Policy, Terrorism, War
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, Asia
  • Author: Francis Rheinheimer
  • Publication Date: 05-2006
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: A senior U.S. State Department official said on April 3 that more violence was expected in the coming months. Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asia Richard Boucher reaffirmed the opinion of some U.S. military leaders that the warmer months and the increased presence of International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) troops would signal a stepped up effort by insurgents to disrupt peacebuilding and reconstruction efforts. Boucher also cited the battle against narcotics traffickers as cause for increased fighting.
  • Topic: Human Welfare, Politics, Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: United States, Asia
  • Author: Francis Rheinheimer
  • Publication Date: 04-2006
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: It has become a truism that any attempt to define or quantify terrorism is informed by political trends, and thus subject to fluctuations based not on hard facts but on political fashion. Yet the State Department's now defunct annual publication, Patterns of Global Terrorism, was the closest approximation of any government effort to provide information in an objective and consistent manner. As a successor to Patterns, the report produced by the U.S. National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) – called A Chronology of Significant International Terrorism for 2004--effectively ends over 20 years of analytical consistency in the U.S. government's terrorism accounting practices.
  • Topic: Human Welfare, Politics, Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Francis Rheinheimer
  • Publication Date: 03-2006
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: Four U.S. soldiers were killed on Feb. 13 when their vehicle hit a bomb in central Afghanistan's Uruzgan province. It was the deadliest single-day loss of American troops since September, when five died in a helicopter crash.
  • Topic: Human Welfare, Politics, Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States
  • Author: Francis Rheinheimer
  • Publication Date: 02-2006
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: Four U.S. soldiers were killed on Feb. 13 when their vehicle hit a bomb in central Afghanistan's Uruzgan province. It was the deadliest single-day loss of American troops since September, when five died in a helicopter crash. On Feb. 19, the Pentagon announced that 215 U.S. soldiers had been killed since the conflict began in late 2001. Of those, 129 were killed by hostile action. On Feb. 23, a man driving a truck filled with explosives was shot and killed by coalition forces after the material failed to explode. He managed to throw one grenade but no soldiers were hurt.
  • Topic: Human Welfare, Politics, Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, America
  • Author: Joseph Button
  • Publication Date: 01-2006
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: On Nov. 30, suspected Taliban militants ambushed a U.S.-led convoy in Helmand province. U.S. warplanes and troops responding to the attack killed two militants. On Dec. 4, two U.S. Chinook helicopters facing enemy fire made emergency landings. The first landed harshly north of Kandahar, injuring five U.S. soldiers. The second aircraft made a came down at a forward base in Uruzgan province, injuring an Afghan soldier.
  • Topic: Human Welfare, Politics, Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States
  • Author: Philip E. Coyle, Whitney Parker, Rachel Stohl, Winslow Wheeler, Victoria Samson, Jessica Ashooh, Mark Burgess, Rhea Myerscough
  • Publication Date: 09-2006
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: In the days before Sept. 11, riding the post-Cold War high, America was blissfully unaware of the threats it faced, and why. A few in the William J. Clinton administration tried to warn their successors about al-Qaida's danger, but overall, most Americans were blindsided by the Sept. 11 attacks. Five years later, America is still largely in the dark.
  • Topic: Defense Policy, Terrorism, War
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, Iraq, Middle East, Asia
  • Author: Victoria Samson
  • Publication Date: 01-2006
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: The United States just took one small step away from the brink. Congress has opted against funding research for a nuclear weapon that would target underground bunkers. This decision squelched a program that would likely have created a new nuclear warhead, something that is particularly incongruous at a time when nations around the world are fervently trying to convince the leaderships of North Korea and Iran that their countries do not need nuclear weapons. However, this wisdom on the part of the U.S. government may prove to be temporary.
  • Topic: Government, Nuclear Weapons, Terrorism, War
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, Asia, North Korea
  • Author: Joseph Button
  • Publication Date: 10-2005
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: U.S. led coalition forces killed 12 militants and arrested nine others in a raid in Zabul province on Sept. 5. Coalition forces did not suffer any casualties. U.S. military officials said the militants used their hideout location to stage attacks before the upcoming Sept. 18 elections. In a remote area of Kandahar province, U.S. and Afghan forces killed 13 Taliban fighters and captured more than a dozen more on Sept. 5. The U.S.-led assault targeted Taliban rebels suspected of the murder of Abduallah Kalid, a candidate for the upcoming elections.
  • Topic: Human Welfare, Politics, Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, Taliban
  • Author: Mark Burgess
  • Publication Date: 08-2005
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: The U.S. State Department's list of Foreign Terrorist Organizations (FTOs) began in 1997 as a method of tracking down and striking back against specific terrorist groups around the world. FTOs are designated as such based on a demonstrated capability and/or willingness to engage in terrorist methods that threaten the U.S. national security interests. These methods include attacks on U.S. nationals, and American national defense, military, diplomatic, and economic interests. The FTO list provides the U.S. government with the legal authority to conduct prosecutions against U.S. citizens, or foreign nationals within the country, for aiding — financially, ideologically or logistically — any designated FTO. FTO designation can also mean certain members or representatives of the designated terror group can be denied entry to the United States through visa rejection or other means. The United States also maintains the authority to compel U.S. financial institutions to freeze any assets linked to an FTO and to report them to the U.S. Department of the Treasury pursuant to Executive Order 13244.
  • Topic: Human Welfare, Politics, Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: United States