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  • Author: Faruk Yalvaç
  • Publication Date: 05-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Institution: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Abstract: This article attempts to evaluate Hegel's theory of international relations in the context of his general philosophy of history. Hegel defines history as a struggle for freedom for mutual recognition. This is true for individuals as well as for states. The struggle for recognition and freedom is a constant feature of social life. Therefore, it would be wrong to interpret Hegel's philosophy as implying that the struggle for freedom has been completed in the modern nation state and that history has come to an end. However, according to Hegel it would be impossible to predict the future shape of the international society and the form which the struggle for freedom will take as “it is just as foolish to fancy that any philosophy can transcend its present world, as that an individual could leap out of his time or jump over Rhodes. ”
  • Topic: Political Theory, History
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Ozan Değer
  • Publication Date: 09-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Institution: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Abstract: Genocide, as an act and a violation of law, place at the top of the hierarchy of crimes and is qualified as crime of crimes. Essentially, being evaluated within the frame of international law, this crime gradually has been come within the scope of the national law. Either the conception or the crime of genocide was composed because of the massacres executed during the WWII, mainly. The basic legal arrangement about the crime was passed at 9 December 1948 and come into effect at 12 January 1951 named United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Convention is obliged the states on the prevention and the punishment of the crime of genocide. Since international criminal courts/tribunals are restricted by the principle of individual criminal responsibility and the Convention incurs the obligation on states, the violation of the Convention causes the responsibility of states. This article, under the light of the conceptional and legal frame, discusses the obligations and responsibilities incur by the Convention and the dramatic judgment of the ICJ, in short, the place and situation of crime of genocide and state responsibility at the legal texts and international jurisprudences.
  • Topic: Genocide, International Law
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Alexander E. Wendt
  • Publication Date: 12-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Institution: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Abstract: The Agent-Structure Problem in International Relations Theory. In this article the nature of structural analysis in each of neorealist and world-system theory are clarified and contrast. The author's primary interest, however, is to critique the conceptions of structural theory found in each of them, and to use this critique to motivate the development of a new approach to structural theorizing about international relations adapted from the work of "structuration theorists" in sociology. In the first section, the author examines the nature of the agent-structure “problem” and briefly identifies the principal kinds of solutions to it. In the second section the author suggests that neorealism and world-system theory embody two of these solutions, the methodological individualist and structuralist ones, respectively. In the third section structurationist approach and its foundations in realist philosophy of science are being defined. In the fourth section, some general epistemological and theoretical implications of structuration theory for the explanation of state action are examined. In the conclusion, the author returns to some implications of scientific realism for social scientific research.
  • Topic: International Relations, Political Theory
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Jamie Mayerfeld, Henry Shue, Jack Donnelly, Kok-Chor Tan, Charles Beitz, Brooke A. Ackerly
  • Publication Date: 01-2007
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Human Rights and Human Welfare - Review Essays
  • Institution: University of Denver - Graduate School of International Studies
  • Abstract: The struggle for human rights has been shadowed by philosophical doubt. Can we assert universal human rights without engaging in moral imperialism? Can we have confidence in the moral beliefs that underlie human rights claims? Can we justify human rights to those who do not believe in the intrinsic value of autonomy? Which Rights Should Be Universal?, the first of two projected volumes on human rights, is a significant contribution to this literature. In a series of original and mind-opening arguments, William Talbott, a professor of philosophy at the University of Washington, lifts us over one philosophical impasse after another. Admirers of Which Rights Should Be Universal? will find their thinking about human rights enlarged and enhanced by a wealth of new concepts; critics will be kept busy in answering the book's copious arguments. From any perspective, Professor Talbott's book moves the conversation about human rights onto a new plane.
  • Topic: Civil Society, Development, Gender Issues, Human Rights, Political Economy, Post Colonialism
  • Political Geography: Global Focus